Video and Audio Effects that Go Unnoticed [Video Island Podcast]

Video and Audio Effects that Go Unnoticed [Video Island Podcast]


Hey, I’m Blake Smith.And I’m Matt King.And we are the Video Island Podcast.That’s right, and on today’s episode,we’ll be talking about the unsung heroes of your video, like the audio and visual effects that go unnoticed if done well.Keyword, if done well.(bright tropical music) All right, so, as you said in the intro, we’re gonna be talking about the unsung heroes when it comes to video production. And there’s unsung heroes being, you know, CG, like computer generated graphics, you know, audio,Slippery sneaky editing.Slippery sneaky, what was that, sorry?Slippery sneaky editing.Slippery sneaky editing, yeah.The stuff that wouldn’t otherwise realize happenedbut it happened on the back end.Yeah, and so, and pretty much, in a nutshell,it’s pretty much stuff that, you know, does require quite a bit of time and effort to make sure that, you know, whatever it is that you’re achieving, whether it’s something visually or sound, that it sounds almost natural, realistic, without, you know, you even noticing.Yeah.I guess, just to kind of you know,share an example would be, you know, I use this example all the time when I’m talking about this topic with people. Is the, I’m pretty sure it was the show 24, you know, with our boy, Keifer Sutherland. Canadian boy, Keifer Sutherland. (laughing) and, what’s his name in 24?JackBauerJack Bauer.Jack Bauer.That’s it. So I knew it was something to do with hockey.Yeah.Bauer is a hockey brand, for those who don’t know.Anyways, Jack Bauer and I think, someone else, I don’t know. They’re sitting on the steps of a white house. Or of The White House, not of a white house. But they’re sitting on the steps of the White House and you know, it looks realistic. It looks like as if they’re sitting on the steps of the White House. But in reality, it’s all green screen. It’s them sitting on like, prop steps that do look like the steps of White House. They’re not that big, but then the rest of it is all green screen. And not even the rest of it is green screen. It’s them sitting them somewhere randomly. It’s just that they’re keyed out and the rest is just computer generated.That’s right.But why they had to do that was becausethere’s no way in hell that they would be allowed to bring an entire crew and film on the front steps of the White House.Yeah.Right.And you know, the fact that it looks so realistic and what not, people wouldn’t even, it doesn’t even process that that required, you know, all this time and effort to, you know, set up the green screen and the rigs to you know, pull that off and then bring it into post production and do all the compositing and what not with lighting and 3D renders and then exporting that to add it to the final edit, which you would then see on TV.Right.And it’s just those things, rightof when it comes to, I guess, computer generated graphics, per se, that when it’s something that’s so believable or doesn’t, you know, go beyond the realm of reality, it’s just subconsciously, your brain’s just telling you like that’s just what it’s supposed to be. Like, that’s just, it’s naturalIt doesn’t even register that it’s something fake.It wasn’t, it was something artificial, which is like, yeah definitely, that’s the key of good CG and that kind of stuff, for sure for sure. And it seems like something so obvious. It’s like, obviously, you want it to look seamless but pretty sure, we can all think of times that you’re watching that movie or show and then you’re looking at just like a dumpster fire in terms of like, CG work. And you’re like, wow. Not to mention, sometimes, the budget allocated towards, you know, movies. I’ve seen some pretty high budget movies. And the work done in there would just be like, holy moly and then, how did that like, how is this allowed? You know what I mean? Like this is terrible.Yeah.Yeah and then also, it just comes to time and money and a lot of factors do come into that, right and and you know, like a prime example, and I guess the other thing with CG, right, is if that computer generated element is beyond the realm of reality, then you know, you’re just automatically being like, that’s clearly fake.Yeah, something in your head gets thrown offand you now, sometimes, you don’t always know what it is. But it’s something you’re looking at and you’re like, this doesn’t look right.But even in those situations where it is,like this is clearly and animal or an alien, whatever it be, or even a spaceship.Yeah.That currently doesn’t exists in the real world,can still be pulled off and look really well done. Like, and example of that, obviously, is not a real thing but looks terrible, even like, there’s some CG like, from the time, like, from old movies where at the time, was bueno. Like that was likeYeah, done right.That was done right, whereas you look back at it now,and it’s like, ooh! Okay, that doesn’t look that great. But an example that sticks out in my, it sticks out in my head even at the time when the movie was released, was terrible, was, what’s it called? The Mummy. When, with the Dwayne The Rock Johnson.The Scorpion King.No, but wast that The Mummy, though?It was The Mummy because they did make the movie after, called the Scorpion King that was his the own standing movie.
Okay.Yeah, it was the follow up to The Mummy. Like, the Mummy Returns?I don’t know, it was like, yeah,I don’t know if it was the second one or the third one. I can’t remember.
Yeah and the Rock is partlike, scorpion part The Rock?
Yeah, he comes outas a scorpion monster and it’s just like,That’s so bad.So bad, even at the time.Whereas like, and obviously this was years ago like, what, 10 years ago. I don’t know, I can’tI think it was early 2000s.So, sure, and so obviously, you know,10, 20 years later, they obviously, the technology has gone beyond in advance. But like, today, though, like even with like the Avengers, like, how they in Infinity War, like how they pulled off Thanos or even with, and that’s a character that’s clearly not a real character, but how they were able to take, you know, the the actor, so Jeff Brolin playing Thanos, and you know, being able pour off the CG with that character to not only one, portray the actor who’s playing him, because you, when you look at Thanos in the movie, you’re like, that’s Josh Brolin.That’s right.But on top of that, to actually convey that,it actually looked real. Like, it looks really really good even though you know it’s not real.Yeah there was motion capture, you know,suits and facial camera markers and all that kind of stuff, make a huge difference in terms of capturing somebody’s actual body movement. It still takes, obviously, a little bit more work to kind of work on some of those (mumbles) ones that’s now in like kind of a 3D space. But definitely, then the next big left obviously, is texturing and lighting. Texturing being a big factor. I feel like, in that example of The Rock, for people who haven’t seen it, I highly encourage you to kind of YouTube it or watch the movie. It’s otherwise, it’s kind of a fun movie but that part really kind of falls off the end. But,It certainly does.It’s, it’s lacking texture in the surfaces of the skinand you know, the claws and it’s just, the motion is not really realistic enough of like, the body movement and it just looks like the facial movements are really weird, so, it’s kind of like watching a video game character just slapped in a movie and you’re kind of like, this looks weird. Like it doesn’t, looks strange, so.Well, yeah, as I say that’s where it’s like the physicscome into play and then I think lately now, and that’s why they’ve gone the route with doing motion tracking, actually having actors portray these characters because it allows them to have a reference point.
Yeah.Take the, look at Planet of The Apes movies that were coming out
That’s exactly whatI was getting at. Andy Serkis, you know, whether he is Gollum or, what’s the other name of?Smeagol.Smeagolin Lord Of The Rings. Or yeah, he plays Caesar in Planet of The Apes.Unbelievable.Like, so good, right.Yeah, the lighting and thatI think it’s definitely one of those arguments that like, it’s harder to pull off some of those little like, the blending of CG and daytime scenes and they kind of proved you wrong because they had scenes where there’s the bridge attack between the different ape species and they were fighting on the bridge, you know, that kind of stuff. And that was during the day. But like, it really shines, obviously, as night, because you can use the darkness to kind if mask some of the effects a little bit more. And in a way, like, that’s an awesome example of just like unbelievable motion capture technology mixed with great performance by an actor that’s get into the role, because he’d having to move like a, like an ape to pull it all off much less the rest of the characters doing the same thing. So, pretty cool, pretty cool stuff. I think that’s the stuff, right. So, I think the trick, obviously, at the end of this as we keep talking is like, you know, the job of people within video production and you know, making movies and things like that is obviously, there’s a lot of stuff that they have to do behind the scenes that’s like, you know, the stuff that you, you see and is maybe left on the (mumbles) floor or whatever. It’s kind of like, we have to try and make things look a little bit more believable as best we can or, you know, mask some things, hide some issues that maybe have come up along the way. So, that’s the task.Yeah, so, yeah, so even so in our situation’cause we obviously don’t work in film and we’re not, you know, in Hollywood working on these big, blockbuster movies. But even these types of things do apply in our work.
Yeah.I, when I was just talking to you prior to recording thishow I have a perfect example for this was, it was a video that we were doing to promote a recharge lounge that we were sponsoring. And and the, it was like a skip based video and the whole premise of the video was that two guys were on the phone and they’re supposed to meet in San Francisco at this conference. It was, it was a summit of some sort. So, I thought we fine to play off this situation where the one character is at aA conference.Well, no, it wasn’t at a conference.He was, he was grabbing a coffee at a Starbucks or something like that near the conference whereas the other individual, it was, I can’t remember, it’s pretty a couple years old now. But the other individual was on the other end of the phone was in, he was on the summit of a mountain ’cause he’s just the doofus of the two and oh, you meant that summit. Ha. Regardless, we wanted to play off the fact that they are on each other’s phone, they’re one their phones and there was a shot where the individual who’s going into the cafe or whatever, looks at his phone and his phone’s supposed to be dead because what happened at the end of the video is that his phone dies and obviously, you know, what’s the purpose of a recharge lounge? Is to obviously charge your phone and other devices, which is surprisingly or not, a hot commodity at conferences because you’re on your phone, or on your laptop, iPad, whatever it be, all day and you know, you need some source of power and a conference always don’t wanna have that. Anyways, so when we were filming that, obviously, the phone was not near dead because that’d just be kind of silly to go and hit production with a phone that’s almost down. It’s like uh oh, what if it died then we’re kind of (mumbles), right? So, there was a shot, like, I got a phone right here so, like, this is an over the shoulder shot holding the phone and yeah, and the so, it wasn’t like anything extreme close up or anything of the battery icon on the phone. But I had to go in in After Effects and in post production and so I found like just in Google images or something like that, I found like a dead battery icon. And I had to bring that in and motion track that shot, apply that image in there and then composite it to match the coloring and the lighting, all that stuff and I had to blend it in to that shot to match and, you know, I’m not trying to toot my own horn here but I did it pretty well that it looked believable. It looked like the actual battery icon on the phone. And it was something that was so small and a lot of people didn’t really notice it, per se.They probably wouldn’t care.They’d be like, oh, okay, yeah, the phone’s dead. The phone’s died.
Yeah.They didn’t really think much of it and it kind of goes back to our earlier point, right, it’s just, it’s nothing beyond the realm of reality and it’s just like, oh, they probably just recorded the phone dead or almost dead with the camera.But for practical reason, on, you know,a film shoot can’t necessarily have that so, like you said, you need that juice because you need the phone to be used for whatever reason so, you can’t have that.Exactly, and at the end of the day,and but the other thing too is also when we’re filming, like, you have glare and what not, right. So, it’s better to you know, if, at least if you know how to do this stuff, it’s better just to do it I post because then, you know, you avoid glare and reflection.You’re saying, don’t record, don’t rely on whatever’son the screen during the shoot?During the shoot, yeah, and apply the stuff in post.Everything that’s on the screenIf you, like, I’m saying, if you now how to do that,’cause if you know how to do that, thenMotion, well you motion capture itand then motion track it in the end, the phone and then overlay the graphic on top to make it look like
Yeah, so, with that,with this example, we actually recorded the phone as is because we had decent lighting. I was prepared for both situations. But it worked out just to keep it on there because it just meant
Time saver.And then less work.I still had to go in and obviously do that thing with the battery icon but with all that said and done, it was necessary. It was needed, right. It did take me, you know, a couple well, I can’t remember how much time, I had probably like two hours to do. But it was necessary and it was a very small detail but within the plot of the video or the story of the video, it was necessary because it was to promote the fact that, you know, we have a lounge that’s gonna recharge your phone or whatever devices and in this sad story, this character’s phone dies, so it was vital to the story. And so, not having that in there would obviously you know, not have helped so. So, that, I think, is an example right there where, being the individual who had to put the work into it, and then showing my peers and people who watched it, it’s one of those things that goes on unrecognized but is definitely needed.It’s very much the, it goes unrecognizedbut if it was wrong, it would be recognized immediately.Yeah.Right, that’s where a lot of our kind of workfalls into, it’s like if you do it wrong, it’s far easier to pick it up versus if you did it right.Yeah.Right?Yeah, that’s me with motion tracking.Like we’ve been doing a lot of that lately. For those who don’t know what motion tracking is, it’s taking something, some plain surface, whatever it be, and then, you know, so whether the camera’s moving, you’re pretty much taking that shot into post production and then having the software process that footage and pretty much take that information, whatever that point is, so you could put in track points into the video yourself or in the situation where this is something you have to do after the fact. You just try to find a point in the video to use as a track point.
Anyways,And then there’s high contrast.Exactly, so anyways, the software will then, you know,will take that point and then do its best to kind of interpolate that and then will give you the data to then apply it to whatever visual element that you want to put on that surfaceTo match the motion.to match the motionof the camera or maybe, the camera’s static but, as you can see here if you’re watching, I’m moving the book around and you can see there’s the logo on the book but we wanna replace that logo. That’s what the tracking would do.Yeah, it’s effectively, it’s like,you pick target within your scene and then you motion track that target so that you can overlay something, text and image, whatever to be in direct movement with that target that you tracked, its’ motion of, so everything sticks where it supposed to stick because if you don’t have that, and you’re doing it manually, it’ll be off and you know, and kind of jarred.It will look very jarring and janky, hand doneand then in that situation, it draws the attention to it.For sure, they’ll go, that’s fake.And looks worse, right.Yeah, for sure.And it just, it goes back to the whole point of thiswhereas something that’s done well will go unnoticed. When it’s done terrible, that’s the only thing noticed.Every singe time.Right?Yeah.And same thing applies with audio, right.So like with audio, you know, think of it as like a Foley effects ad what not, right, on movies. We’ll even think of that. I know we’ve talked in another episode where it’s, you’re using like, you know, especially on film sets and what not, you’re using say a cinematic camera like a Ren or something like that, that camera does not record the audio, so unless you are, you know, have someone there recording the audio for you, you sometimes have to recreate that audio. So, for the most part, obviously, you’re gonna have like a sound engineer and other people that are like the people recording that are, the people recording the audio, you see that person that puts mics on the actors and the subjects, they have a, you know, often, they’ll operate kind of a boom with a shotgun microphone on to capture the sound but that’s a separate thing that needs to be kind of layered together in post production, so, that’s why you see a sleight on movie sets with all the, it’s, usually, it’s like, the black and white striped thing, it’s got all the details of the shot, the scene, the director, blah blah blah and then they slap it so that they have the visual representation of the sleight closing and slamming closed and then they’ll have the audio spike from the audio, external audio source. They take the visual of the sleight closing and pair that with the audio file and they see the spike in the audio and they pair those two up and that’s how you sync your audio post kind of thing. But obviously, the sleight also goes reference to the scene and the take, and the cut, all that’s kind of stuff. So, that’s good, you know, information for an editor to figure out what they’re looking at. So, that’s obviously the other benefit of it. But yeah, definitely it’s one of those circumstances that, you know, in a poor audio scenario, you gonna have to make up some of the audio or, I mean you need to emphasize. A lot of it is just emphasizing and adding a little bit of extra to your scene, right. So, it’s like you have an action scene or you’re gonna add in slaps and punches and kicks and slams and things breaking to which is all Foley more or less that you either get somebody in your crew to produce using whatever funky tools you have.So, before you dive in to that,just for our audience, in the case they don’t know what Foley is, do you mind explaining what Foley effects are?Foley effects are basically just sound effectsor additional effects that are the recreation of sounds that you’d hear in a scenario. So, if you look up Foley effects, you know, or Foley sound effects kind of thing, you’ll see that it’s usually you can find libraries of like, you know, person walking in gravel and you know, some like, some crazy stuff like a bone’s breaking and it’s obviously not typically bones breaking. It’s somebody recreating that noise by other means. So, you’ll see like, in a Foley artists’ like studio, they’re using things likeCelery.some parts breaking, yeah, celeryand they kind of like snap it slowly, which it could be like kind of a recreation, with the right kind of effects layered on of like, you know a bone breaking or they’ll take certain materials because they find that maybe they’re not getting the most, like adequate audio by recreating just recording boots walking on the ground and on gravel and they want that sound of like, footsteps on gravel. I mean, they need to find some other material that emphasizes the sound of the gravel a little bit more, so, sometimes it’s not like a direct recreation of like, a sound that you want in the scene. You know, maybe it’s like a war film and then they’re walking on like a sandy beach or whatever. And then like, the material changes under their feet. Well, you have to recreate that for the audience, right. So, it’s up to that Foley artist or you know, a great Foley library to be able to pull from to find those sounds and make that happen. And again, it’s very much one of those things, it’s like when you’re watching a movie, you just anticipate those sounds to be there but that’s an entire layer of the editing process is adding in all of those little sounds.Yeah exactly.Like light switches, car starting, everything.Like, all those little things, more often than not, added in post production kind of thing as a separate sound. So, and it’s on us to when we’re doing higher level campaign videos even for our work, or if we’re doing something a little more funky or skip based, we have to do kind of a same process where we kind of isolate sounds if it’s important to our scene, so, we’ve done it recently where, we have a stuffed animal kind of like hitting on a table but then we’ll get a secondary take of for the audio, our audio professional who’s on set to be able to get up close with the shotgun microphone and record the same sound of that impact so we can use that if we want to if we didn’t necessarily wanna get Foley and pay for that. So, it’s all those little things, right. But again, if you, if that sound wasn’t there and you just see this thing kind of hit the table and you’re not really getting a sound represent that, and particularly, if it’s supposed to be emphasized because it means something to that scene, you’re gonna be missing something and your brain might not always understand why. But you’ll know something;s off, so, I’m sure there’s probably on YouTube, you can watch videos, it’s like Foley stripped from a scene and just watch it and you’ll kind of understand more of what we’re talking about, so, if you pull those sounds up, how it effects how a scene comes together, it’s like, it’s kind of, it’s very weird.So, Matt and I actually went to school togetherand that was a project of ours that we did and that’s was a project for us while we were in college and you know, if you feel like trying yourself, by all means, just do what Matt said, is find a scene and just remove all the audio from it. Probably easier if you find a scene that doesn’t have dialogue.Yeah, that’s a little bit more fun, I find itrather than having to dub dialogue over dubbed dialogue. It’s more fun to get into a scene that’s like action based or something like that.Yeah, so if you, if you were to do that,it would really open your eyes on like all and just take that clip and just add just try to source all those sounds that you think that would fit the scene and then compare with the original, right. And it’s actually like,It’s pretty unbelievableLike, you think like, ’cause when we did it like,I don’t know, it thought ours were reasonably well. But there’s just so many layers that you miss, like ambient, like ambient tones, like, just the minor details of like, I don’t know, like, the scene that I, we didn’t do the same thing, with the same project but the scene that I did was from the first Transformers movie. And it was the scene where the scorpion was jumping out of the sand and and it’s just, but there’s this part of the scene where it goes slow mo and so, it’s like, adding that element of complexity of like, this is the sound but then not adding it, distorting it to sound like it’s in slow mo, but you have the, yeah, the whole thing of the individuals running around in the sand you have the guns going off, you have this massive robot jumping in and out of the sand.All of the mechanical noises.There is signs falling down and it’s justit really, you know, draws the attention to all the minor details.For sure, definitely if it’s something you’re kind ofgetting into or interested in, I’d say that’s a fantastic practice because it’s actually a lot of fun. I found that project to be a lot of fun in terms of just audio editing of balancing and not only just getting all those sounds and just throwing them in and finding where perhaps, you were missing sounds and where there’s kind of like, empty spaces where there should be supporting sound that you didn’t realize that’s is actually in the original cut but even balancing. You know what I mean? Balancing your audio so that you have, like you said, you kind of have the undertones or your ambient sounds but then you have your mid tones and then you have like your highlight, your peaks. You have those sounds that are supposed to be kind of like impacting and hard and heavy. Those are gonna be like higher up on the decibels, kind of thing like that so, it’s like all of those little things that you start to kind of figure out. Like, not every sound is supposed to lay on the same plane.And you have a thing of like the environment too,of like with the Ren, right, because then that obviously plays off like you know, is there echo, the reverb, all like, like audio itself is like a world of its own.It’s such a monster, it’s such a monster.You can probably do an audio on,well, not us per se ’cause we’re not the audio experts but there could be an Audio Island podcast.Right.Just about allI think we know enough to be dangerous but, there’sfor all the things that you could coverin the audio world.
Some unbelievableengineers out there and all the other, it’s just like, I learned previously about like the different colors of noises. Like, people just think like, white noise but there’s like pink noise, blue noise, red noise, purple noise, like, green noise, like all those like, huh. What’s pink noise? It’s like well, it’s a certain frequency and you know what I mean, you have that in to recreate this kind of sound. It’s like what, like, meanwhile you’d hit like pink noise and sample and you’re like, I don’t hear anything. But like, to an engineer probably means something in a specific field and you’re like, what? So, it’s crazy. But either way, we’re gonna get back to that point where just like, you know, those things again that kind of go unnoticed, so, like, you know, audio in our world consists of within like, you know, video for business, it’s like, you know, we’re very much balancing quite often a music track mixed with dialogue or or just a voice, you know. Maybe it’s not two people talking but it’s just one person kind of presenting information. So, there’s important factors there in terms of if I were to just slap in the music and just slap in my what I recorded from my from my on camera talent for their voice. And I slapped that together without any kind of like adjusting, it would probably be, you probably wouldn’t wanna listen to it, you know, and so, when I pull in music, oftentimes, the music tracks are very strong. They’re giving a lot of kind of variation in terms of their decibel range, because this is just how music is. It has highs and lows and in betweens, all that kind of stuff. But if I wanted to adjust the volume of that just as a starting point, it would be directly competing with the volume in which my person would be speaking, so, that’s one of those things that just is like an obvious but it goes it’s just under appreciated, right. It’s like balancing my audio, my music to be at a certain level so that it’s not comparing with my voice but it’s still there, right. Not to mention it’s like, okay, there’s things I need to do to my voice. You know, I play with the dynamics of an individuals’ voice by adding that effect on so that I can kind of compress their audio so that they have less highs and lows. Maybe they’re talking in this tone but then next point, they’re kind of talking like this. It’s like, well, very mild change in volume over the course of a longer video can kind of be a brutal listening experience, particularly, if there’s kind of a peak in the music that’s a little bit higher at one point too, even though I’ve kind of controlled the levels there, you could still have competing sound. So, I have to compress my audio of my voice and raise all that sound up so that it’s kind of at a more acceptable level but it’s consistently at a certain kind of level of decibels. Again, there’s other effects, like, you know, I add a little bit of bass and a little bit more just to beef up the person’s sound so that they’re a little bit more present and there’s a little bit more resonance. So, then they sound fuller. You know, without those things, people can end up, depending on the environment that they’re in, sound a little hollow. Sometimes you’re doing noise reduction. So, maybe they’re in kind of a noisy environment and that’s just my, that’s where I have to shoot them in. Like, I don’t have the choice. I’m getting rid of the ambient sound in the room. So maybe there’s an HVAC system that’s kind of directly competing with a certain frequency in their voice. It’s on me to, when I’m recording my interview, for example, being aware of hearing that ventilation sound kind of blowing in and hitting my ears through the microphone, I have to make sure that I get a 10 second snip of that audio with nobody speaking so that I can directly use that as a reference clip to isolate that background ventilation sound and remove it using a noise reducer effect. And pull that out of my interview sound. So, you can kind of, it’s a really cool tool and it works really well if you’re delicate with it and then it, we get rid of like that high hissing kind of noises kind of in the background of sound. So, those little things that you do, it’s like it goes unnoticed. But if it’s in there with like a and it’s kind of in the background, it’s less of an enjoyable listening experience. Some people don’t even always know why. They just don’t like the sound of what they’re listening to. But if you broke it down, that’s oftentimes some of the reason. It’s like, low, there’s not a lot of meat to their voice. There’s maybe some hiss in the background. Maybe the music’s a little too high. If you don’t do those steps, it’s like, okay well, you’re missing out on making things sound as good as they can. That’s not even to touch on the video aspects too. So there’s things within video that come up that are like very minor and like kind of a day today thing. But like color correction. And I think I’ve spoken about it before in the past, that color correction is such an important step because particularly as you get into certain cameras, it’s our choice to shoot in what we call a flatter picture profile. So, what that essentially means is that it gives us the ability in editing to pull out the colors a little bit more. And correct things and potentially color grade things a little bit more. Kind of talk about that later but, effectively, it’s like the more control we have in the editing, the better the outcome will be in terms of the visual quality and the colors and the contrast, all that kind of stuff. And so, I find that people often miss that step when they’re getting into video of just recording something, and being like, that looks good enough. And they just export it and upload the video like that’s, well, you need to always color correct your footage because there’s little things that you can just change within the background in terms of contrast or the person’s skin tone, all that kind of stuff can be even mildly changed in editing to make a serious difference to the visual quality.Before we, because that is our last talk,because editing andOh, what was I doing?
I’m jumping ahead.
Before we jump ahead, I just wanna talk aboutthe last thing I wanted to kind of (mumbles) with audio and I have both an example for the film world but then also back down when doing, producing video for business, is when you have something that is conceptual and and trying to make a sound that fits that. So, from the business standpoint, you know, the example being motion graphic videos. So, you have motion graphic videos that maybe it’s a explainer video and you’re explaining a product or maybe it’s a video that’s gonna kick off an event and the elements that you’re using are more conceptual opposed to something real and you wanna go take it a little bit further and not just have voice over and audio. Maybe in the, and by audio, I mean music. But maybe in the situation, you don’t have a voice over. And you need that kind of, you need to add more texture when it comes to the audio and just having a music track, it just kind of seems pretty empty. So, looking at those elements and trying to determine what those, what sounds would match that and that itself is tricky because it’s really ’cause you know, the sky is the limit because the element that you’ve created visually is conceptual. So the audio, to match that is conceptual. So,
The world is your oyster,that there no predetermined tone or sound.And like, and a real good example in the filmside of things, that like, which relates to this that, you know, when it’s done really well, was I can’t remember the individuals name but he was the sound engineer on Jurassic Park and Jurassic World, all the Jurassic Park movies. And what he did to create the roar of the T-Rex was he pretty much took the sound of an elephant seal and a baboon and all these different animals and layered them together and tweaked them and what not, to make what we hear today in Jurassic Park. And because of that movie and what he created there is now what we expect to hear from a dinosaur. Nobody has ever heard a T-Rex roar.No.Obviously, because it’s, they’re extinct.Yeah, it can just sound like, ah! (laughing)Imaging that, ah!
(mumbling)
But, like, it just comes to show that taking something that you know, that is the unknown and pulling something in to, you know, associate with that concept, you know, that is a prime example of like, something done really well that obviously has stuck with everyone that is now associated. So, even in in the sake of motion graphics, you know, you could have a ball bounce and then but like, it’s just a circle bouncing across a screen or something like that. But then you also have to think, like it goes back to kind of the environment and what not and what fits best that matches all the other sound effects is the ball big or small? So, then you are thinking of like, the pitch and the tone and then again, is the space that it’s in, is it really big? So, do you need to add echo? And, you know, you yourself, when we did that motion graphic video that kicked off the event, you know, it was very conceptual with just minimal designs with lines and circles and dots. But it had a space theme to it and and you know, so, we had like, things that simulated a flash light and what not so that kind of helped drive the direction of the sound effects but still, it’s open for interpretationTotally.on whatthose sound effects you use. So, it just goes right there where just to kinda tie this all together in regards to kind of the unsung heroes when it comes to audio engineering, audio editing and what not is that you can have the situation where, yes, you know exactly what sound you’re looking for. But where do you source that from? And how do you, you know, tie that in to match the source? But then at the same time, you also have those elements that are more conceptual and then how do you interpret what that would sound like when you don’t really know.That’s right.So, people who do that just in my books, (tongue clicking)really you know, hit, that’s a home run right there.That’s right.Yeah, your brain think a different way because yeah, you can look at like, expanding circle goes from like, you know, it’s not there on screen and obviously it like, pops out, it goes, woop! You know. Immediately to me, right, I made the noise, woop! So, there’s like growth sound right.Or it could be the stretching elastic, right.So it’s like, okay, depending on the video,and the context and the theme and the mood and the like the vibe, everything like that. What’s that, it comes down to like cues, right. So, you need in a motion graphic video, you need that cue. You need that audible cue to capture somebody’s attention to paying more attention to that specific thing on frame. So, what is that gonna sound like? It’s a challenge. Sometimes it’s like oh, what am I supposed to do here? It’s like I need, there’s something but there isn’t something necessarily that I can create this noise with immediately that makes the most sense. So you have to really dig deep. But that’s part of the fun. Like you said, that’s part of the challenge. So, if you can pull that off and make something that works, then if people don’t just really like see it as jarring, then you’ve done a good job.Yeah.So,like I said, it’s like if we watched Jurassic Park and you saw one of the T-Rex’s go (screams) like, I’m pretty sure it would be a comedy movie then right. People will be like, well, that’s not right.Definitely right.So you have to kind of like steer into thatkind of like that vibe that you’re trying to give off.Exactly, exactly.So, yeah, so let’s talk about what you were so, you were talking aboutI’m sorry, listen, next timeI start getting ahead of myself, just like pinch me or something. Just like kick me under the table or something.Ah.Ow, why are you kicking me?(laughing)So, yeah, so last thing let’s kind of talk about,you know, these types of things, those things that go unnoticed in the realm of editing. And I guess editing that is kind ofBroad term.Yeah, but it is kind of an underlying premise of editingis to you know, ’cause let’s, you know, if you’re shooting a scene and then you have all these different angles, obviously depends on what the scene is, sequentially, there’s an order to it, right. But in reality, maybe you shot that scene over a span of two days or you shot it completely out of order, right. It could be in a situation where you shot this one part of that scene in one location and you had to then shoot somewhere else. And to make that seem like it’s one location or it was all don’t in one go, just speaks for itself, right.That’s multiple things playing into it, too, right.So, not only is it being able to be crafty with how you’re editing that scene together but obviously it comes from geared kind of set awareness when you’re shooting, right. So, paying attention to you know, what’s in your scene, what do people look like? What people wearing?Matching of lighting.Yeah, match the lighting matches the space,all that kind of stuff. In our world we have less of that worry but definitely when you’re creating like a skit based thing which we do and it still becomes a factor, right? Because, yeah, depending on a shoot day yeah we had to shoot things out of order to kind of nail things down a certain way. Or it makes more sense to start with like a series of these wide shots and then move to our medium shots next.Yeah.So you don’t have toYeah to reframe back up in the wide shotand try and shoot in order. Sometimes, yes, sometimes we can conveniently get away with shooting in order but other time, yeah, like you said, you storyboard it out and you realize okay, like, it makes more sense to shot like this, well, shot list this in chunks based on like what I’m required to, take for example, in the idea that we did the Halloween video. So, in that example, we shot it in my backyard around the campfire. The scene was monsters around a campfire. And so, one factor that played into that well was well, it didn’t make a whole lot of sense to try and keep a little fire going at the same intensity each time when you did a be on a close up on a different individual and try and maintain that ’cause we wanted that flickering to be the main source of light on that person along with a light off to the side that was casting a bit of light on that person acting as kind of like the moonlight, right. So, you had your moonlight, which is just kind of like a highlight and then you had the fire like being the flickering, inconsistent light there being your main source, kind of for that subject when you’re in a close up or a medium shot of somebody. Well, it didn’t make a lot of sense to necessarily go ahead and shoot that, and like I said, trying to maintain a fire the whole time. So, it made more sense that we started out of order by shooting our close ups for the day first. Or for that night first. So, at that night, we went from person to person to person capturing all of their lines and we used one of our lights and our light has a dimmer on it so, I got used to and I’d operate the light flickering the demo kind of
You put a gel on toYeah, we put a red gel in front of the lightto give off that kind of warmer cast light and then I got you to kind of like, inconsistent like kind of flicker it within a certain percentage range that kind of seemed like it would be reminiscent of you know, what a fire would give off, right. And then I think it really pulled off that effect thatBecause people who watched itthought it was a real fire.
They had no idea.Had no idea. So, and then what we did then, obviously is that the end of our shoot is when we actually started a fire because we were getting our wide shots then so, then you could actually see the fire in between this grouping of characters. So, that’s when it became less about casting light on their face, per se, and more on the overall scene and their space. So, and then when it comes to the editing, you’re having to start off with my wide shots to establish the scene. Then cut to a close up to somebody, then cut to another close up and then back to a medium shot and you still see a fire in the scene. Whatever. You know, those little things, again, it would go unnoticed. Is like okay, we’ve probably just shot in a very specific way and the fire was going the whole but it’s like, there’s sneaky little things that you can do. That make a big difference.
Well, yeahand even with the audio too, with the audio thing too, like these are all just techniques when it comes to editing. But even just, these shots that were out of order but it’s even when it comes to the editing floor it’s just like, you can take the track of somebody talking and have it underline another shot even though that shot was filmed like maybe an hour later. After that, that line of dialogue was recorded, right.Yeah andAnd so we’re justgiven you know, the sequencing of the editing and what not and then again, using the audio to you know, overlap into that next scene helps kind of establish or portray that, you know,This is happening all in one fluid like,this to this to this. It wasn’t shot at, yeah and you’ll see that a lot when you’re watching a movie or a TV show for example, and you’ll see them cut to what we call an over the shoulder shot. So, you have is that you’re getting, your camera’s view is pointed at somebody. But it’s form the direction of basically, like, you might see the two actors and they’re having a conversation across the table from one another, for example and then the camera is over the one person’s shoulder shooting towards the other character. And then they flip it to get the other person’s response back the other way, kind of thing. So, that standard over the shoulder, oftentimes, if they need to to cover up a line or, you know, change things up, is that, they have the person talking but then they’ll switch with that person’s over the shoulder shot pointing to the other person. And for the reaction, but sometimes it’s not from the same shot, right. So, sometimes, it’s like they didn’t have two cameras set up, they just had the one. So, you’re cutting away and hoping that you’re not seeing too much of that person’s face or their mouth to see that they weren’t actually saying what they were saying at the time. Sometime films do it better than others. Sometimes, there’sI was gonna say, have you seenwhen another person’s talking and the mouth stopped?Oh yeah, it’s way off like, not movingor it’s like totally different. If you were a decent mouth reader, sometimes you’re gonna be like, yeah, that’s like not even close to what they said in that moment.Yeah, or they’re not even talking at all.yet can hear them talking.But, for most people, yeah.,but for most people, that’s like a little trick to kind of cut that kind of scene together and yeah, like, they obviously felt during editing that they needed that kind of reaction. So, they needed to cut that shot and flip it over or something. So, that’s like a good way of doing it. It’s like, you’re masking it. And for most cases, it works pretty well. To go long the lines of that Halloween example again, it’s like you know, to bring all these shots kind of together, in the instance that you know, again, we didn’t have a fire started, is that I had to, we had to record that on the sound effects of the fire during the shoot once we actually started to get close on the fire. And then I used that fire of the crackle and everything and then I looped it underneath in low volume to kind of establish that the fire was actually going the whole time, right. And it’s one of those things again, it’s like, obviously, there was a fire going, it’s like, but there actually wasn’t and it’s just like some sneaky deaky editing to kind of make that seem like it was. So, it’s little things like that that kind of go a long way.We, well, sorry, not to cut you offbut even a very very simple example of just things that would go unnoticed if done right, like both from the visual and audio side of things is ’cause even if you blend the, so say you have an interview, you’re talking, you know, you have the talking head, that’s your A track and then, you know, you’re cutting out those sections, you’re cutting out the sound bites that you wanted in the video and you’re stitching those all together, obviously you wanna hide those jump cuts so then you then overlay with B-Roll, right? Now, if you’re taking those sound bites at the right moment and then have enough, you know, you’re not like splicing two too close together or you’re cutting them off when they’re not actually taking a breath and they flow together, you and with the use of B-Roll, it could seem like ’cause if it sounds fine all the way through because that’s the underlining thing that keeps it connected while watching the B-Roll, if that all seems seamless, at least from the audio and then having the B-Roll over top, that one minute interview that was maybe 10 minutes long could seem like that was literally the,One thought.The one, yeah,entire tape whereas maybe that’s what it was, was you took six different clips and condensed it down to one minute and that right there is this a very simplified version of, you know, taking editing and doing it well that the viewer doesn’t even notice the breaks in the edit.That’s a big factor too and that a delicate factorin terms of like, you’ll have people saying that I was interviewed and I’m being misrepresented and that’s not what I said and that’s not what I meant. That because the editor took the liberty or they intentionally went ahead and made this person say something else.That’s reality TV in a nutshell right there.Exactly.That’s most reality TV or any of that stuff and that’s so cut out of place that you’re like, all right, but if you know, it’s one of those things that ruins it for you and like, you don’t believe any of it ’cause you’re like, this is clearly out of context. But it can also be like a legality thing depending on the severity or if it’s like it’s directly dealing with pretty serious issues, misrepresenting what somebody says, you know what I mean? Is something that can be very delicate. And so, it’s our job to make sure that whatever we’re editing, somebody to say, it’s still representative of the thought. And we’re not making something that they wouldn’t have said themselves, right. So, it’s a very delicate kind of thing, so. But it’s tricky. So, but it’s definitely necessary when it comes to whittling down what could otherwise be a very long interview.Yeah, and like in the whole reality TV example,is like, that’s a great example right there just to show if you are really good at it and do it well, you can totally change the narrative of the story.
They do it all the time.That’s how most reality TV is made. They like make people say these things that they didn’t actually say.But it’s believable ’cause people buy into that characterand they’re like, ah, that person’s a jerk and in reality, it’s lie, well, no they’re not. Chances are they’re actually about something entirely different and then they cut that clip and went blah.ExactlyThat’s what I think about that person.It’s like they’re actually talking about whether or not they like cilantro. You’re like that’s garbage or like, totally, like , whatever, you know what I mean? They just like totally like spice in there. My wife loves reality TV stuff and sometimes I get into it, I’m like, okay, but like, you know, it’s so formulaic now. It’s like, okay.Yeah, it can be painful to watch.Yeah, it’s a little tough but you know,you see it all the time. So that’s kind of how you can kind of use editing to influence a thought and make it sound like it was one statement, right, whereas in fact, it was something said over like a course of an entire interview process right so, it’s kind on sneaky like that. I’ve used, you know, there’s other things within editing that are kind of like really good tricks that I’ve found, you know, as the technology gets better, it becomes that much easier to be able to kind of pull off a certain thing and get away with it, right, so there’s something within Adobe Premier which is the editing software we use, called like, the morph cut or morph dissolve.Yeah, it’s the morph cut.Morph cut.And that’s been kind of a saver in just a couple of instances. It’s gotta be used, it’s like a very intense spice,It’s delicate.‘Cause you gotta use it very very sparinglybut in those moments that it can save you, it’s like, yes, and circumstances there, it’s like maybe somebody was giving you an answer and it was live and you didn’t have the chance to like retake that section of an interview, for example. They say something and they’re getting to a really brilliant point but then they have like a sneeze in the middle of it or they cough really loud. It’s like and then they carry on with their brilliant point. You’re like, oh god and then, you know, you have to take out that really abrupt thing in the middle. So, your only hope is that you can use for example, this morph cut effect to take the cough out, put the two clips together, then start in the finished bit. And if you apply this morph cut on top, what is does is it kind of interpolates the footage to kind of blend them. It’s not a cross dissolve and it’s not a jump cut but kind of blends the motion as though they kind of never had that blip in the middle.It’s how I kind of see it, ’cause it morphs itand so, it’s almost like if you’re familiar with like in Photoshop, there’s a liquefy type tool. It’s pretty much just taking that one frame and the other frame and then yeah, morphing it to look like it. So, it’s really good like, that’s and that’s why I would say, use it sparingly and it’s delicate because the shots have to look similar so, it’s really good for talking ahead and like interview style stuff because generally, they’re just standing there and there’s not too much motion, you know, or any drastic changes in between, in between the two shots. So, it’s very similar whereas, if they’re on the right side of the frame. On the one, on ones clip and then left side, like, it does the morph. Don’t get me wrong but you’re gonna see theYeah, you’re gonna see something weird happening.It’s like I said, it’s used in a very specific instance and like an ideal scenario that morph cut looks very good. It’s way better than a jump cut or a dissolve. In the case, particularly, that you don’t have B-Roll.Exactly.But there’s, sometimes, it’s like,I need this person to be on camera because they’re saying something very sincere and they need them to be on camera and that’s when that morph kind of saved me. And it’s like, that is an amazing thing. But again, if done right, goes unnoticed, people don’t know and then even be like, ha ha like, got that one. So, yeah, it’s a great thing.Yeah so I think that’s everything I thinkwe wanted to cover in regards to the things that go unnoticed in the realms of video production and the unsung heroes that do put in that time and that effort that do it right, you know, because we’ve both been in that situation where things like going unnoticed and you don’t, and it’s kind of bitter sweet because you didn’t get the reaction. You don’t get like, the whoa! ‘Cause you know, they are those times we put the effects in and you know, it’s like, a blatant effect there. They’re like, oh, that’s cool but then at the same time, something that you patch up or whatever you do to blend in something, it just goes unnoticed, there is that kind of reward to it because you know you did the job right if nobody’s like, complaining or drawing attention to it and being like, oh, that looks fake or that looks out of place or whatever it be or that sounds really loud or very jarring or terrible, whatever it be. It just, it just goes a long way when you know, it’s done right and it achieved what you’ve wanted to do within the context of the video.All you get to really do is pat yourself on the backin those moments. Like, job well done.Really, exactly.And yeah, and that’s why I wanna, that’s why we’re calling this segment, you know, those unsung heroes because credit to those people who do put the time and effort into executing on these things to make things seem natural or believable within the shot both visually and audio-bly-bly?Audio-bly-bly, yeah.
(laughing)
audibly.Audibly, all right.I don’t know what the proper word,That would be audibly.Audibly?But I like audio-bly-bly.
(laughing)
A-bly-bly-bly-bly, that’s all folks.Speaking of which, we’re done here.Yeah, we are done.If you have any questionson this stuff, feel free to message us because I’m sure there’s gonna be people, people that have a sticky point that they’re,Yeah and then, and as, you know, you stated to the video,YouTube this stuff, like, there’s so many example out there and it’s actually quite baffling to see the amount of effort of what people do to pull things off whether it’s CG or audio based.Yeah, that’s pretty neat.That said, thanks for watching.Thanks for listening. Tune in next time.See ya!(bright tropical music) Thanks for watching this episode of the Video Island podcast brought to you by Vidyard. You can subscribe to the audio version on your favorite podcast platform or check out more videos here. (bright music)

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