RADIO PRESENTERS TALK IDEAS FOR PODCASTS

RADIO PRESENTERS TALK IDEAS FOR PODCASTS


– Live, it’s not even
recording, it’s live. – Oh, wow, okay. – I’ve got my friend Steffan
here, Steffan La Touche. We used to work together
at Leicester Sound and a little bit at
Trent as well, didn’t we? – We did, we did, we did. – We’re having a breakfast meeting. Got our coffee on the go. You are very healthy, actually. – Salmon, well, that’s
’cause I’m with you. – Oh my god. – I have to be healthy with you. Should have seen how much butter you put on your toast. – I love my butter, which is not bad, as my health professionals will tell you. It’s a good fat, it’s a good fat. But, yeah, I did have lashings of butter. – Plenty of good fat this morning. – So we’re just talking about podcasts because me and Steffan are gonna be doing some work this year. We’re gonna be launching some training around podcasts, we’re just kind of sorting out the–
– Logistics. – The logistics of it all. But Stef’s got his own studio, he’s a voiceover artist now as well, and so we’re gonna be doing some training with anyone who wants to come on board. So we’ll be releasing details about that in the next few weeks.
– Yes. – But we were just talking. I find it really interesting what they’re saying about podcasts in America, podcasts in the U.K. What’s your perception? – In England, we have a culture that’s very central to radio, so everybody listens to the radio, everybody has the radio on, it’s sort of something we’ve grown up doing. – Yes. – And in America, at
least in my experience, the radio isn’t as big a deal out there. It’s very music-driven,
there’s a lot less talking, and they don’t have, like, a Radio 1 and a Radio 2, like a national
broadcaster like we do. Each state itself has its own sort of federal broadcaster. So there’s no one right
across the country. – No national, like a BBC Radio 1 or 2. – And because it’s a continent, it would be way too difficult because there’s a two hour time difference from the east coast to the west coast. – Yeah. – So you’ve got a lot of issues there. Therefore, podcasts
have become more popular because they’re so accessible, and you can literally
take them wherever you go, and I think that that’s something that, I think because, at
the moment, in England, the only real way to listen to a podcast is on your phone or your computer. – Yeah. – It hasn’t caught on quite in the way that it has in the states. If you could listen to
any podcast in your car, by literally surfing
for it, I think it would be more popular, because it’s convenient. The problem is convenience, isn’t it? – Yeah.
– And most people listen to Radio 1 or Radio 2 and they’ll get all the news, they’ll get everything they need to know,
they’ll hear a few songs, and that kind of is all
they want, you know. But I think that if you look at podcasts like Serial, which really grabbed people, it’s kind of debunked the myth that everything live has to
be (unintelligible). – Is that the one that you told me about? – It’s about the murder cases. – Oh wow, tell everyone what it is. – They’re onto the third season
they’re about to release, it’s basically a serial investigation in a podcast form of somebody who went through a case where they felt the person who committed the crime was innocent, and they’ve gone through the case, examined the evidence, interviewed people, and they’ve basically tried to force an appeal, which they got. – Oh, wow. – Actually forced an appeal. – So it’s like that Netflix drama. – Exactly the same, but podcast version. – Wow, and I mean, I think that’s an area that in the U.K., I’ve certainly not seen anything like that.
– No, no. No, but then I think our
legal system’s very different. – True.
– So there’s probably an element of that, too. – My guys are mainly fitness professionals and wellness professionals.
– Yeah. – And they all kind of do like, they’ll have a guest on, it’s very formatted in the same way, they’ll have one guest. I think there’s areas that they could maybe widen out a little bit, a little bit like Chris Moyles would do the zoo format, where he
had a crowd of people in, like they’d talk to Dominic on news, I can’t remember all the people, but it’s called zoo format, isn’t it? – Yeah, he’s back on the air now, on XFM. I think he’s got two people in the studio with him, and Dominic to do the news. – So could you translate
radio things like that, so just changing up so it’s not one-on-one all the time, and having a zoo format, could you do that with podcasts as well? – Yeah, of course you could. – Or a serialisation rather than a Q&A every week. Do something like they’ve done, with the serials, so you follow a certain topic for six weeks, let’s say. – But what Serial is very good at doing is Serial is, it’s positioned
toward the listener. A lot of podcasts are, like you and I now, it’s a case of, “This is my podcast, “I’m going to interview someone. “We’re gonna have a conversation. “Hopefully you’ll get something out of it. “And then you’ll go and implement “it in your life at some point.” – Yeah. – What Serial do is they kind of, it’s almost like they’re
telling you the story, and allowing you to think about it, and almost discover what
they’re discovering with them, almost like you’re a fly on the wall in what’s happening at the time. And I think that that’s
what really connects with people, is they feel like they’re a part of that
investigation process. So, with most podcasts,
people are thinking not necessarily about the person that’s listening to it, they’re thinking about creating a good
show, being entertaining, because that’s what we’re used to, that’s what we watch, you know. But, realistically, you could do a Q&A with somebody, and you could just chop up all the bits that are relevant, and say, “Today we’re gonna focus
on health and wellbeing.” And, like, “What’s the number one reason “for warming up? This is what so-and-so “has to say about it.” – Yeah.
– And just literally target that particular instruction to the person who’s listening without all the waffling about. Some people don’t want
all the waffling about. Some people just want the nuggets. – I think what would be interesting, if you take that Serial… We’ve got somebody on here. – Hello Natalie Walsh.
– Natalie Walsh, hello! One thing that would be
interesting if you take that, I like the idea of the Serial, is a lot of my guys do
body transformations, and so it would really interesting to take somebody, a case
study from episode one to episode 12, ’cause they tend to do them in 12 weeks,
and follow their journey. Or a marathon runner. Talk about what you need to do on week one before you run the
marathon in 12 weeks time, and then the last one could be them running the London
marathon with them crossing the finish line, that would be amazing. – I think that what we, you know, because of video and audio being editable, we now get highlights.
– Yeah. – Everything’s about highlights, right? Everybody wants headlines and highlights. You watch a programme
about refurbishing a house, and we all wanna skip to the end, see what it looks like. We know it’s a dump at the beginning, we just wanna see it at the end, right? And it’s the same with health and fitness. People wanna see somebody who’s obese and at twelve weeks is ripped and lean. But what I think is important is that we continually remind the audience that it’s really hard work, it’s not a click and they’re there, you know. And I think if you did a case study and you’re able to ask these people on a regular basis, “How are you feeling? “Has it been difficult this week? “What’s been easy this week?”
– Yeah. – “What has changed?” Maybe they’ll be saying things like, “Well, exercise has been easier, “but I’ve been really tempted this week “and that’s been hard.” Or, “I cracked and I had a cookie.” – And people can identify with that. It’s real life.
– That is real life. – And I think it’s more
about the journey now. I think we’ve gone through that exposure to social media and the quick response, and I think
people are more interested now in the meat of the story.
– Yeah. – I think it’s gonna go the other way. – I think that’s how it should be, because the reality is,
once you’ve achieved it, you’re then onto the next thing. The most important part is that process, and what, hopefully,
you learn on the journey to get to the end. – You know what, somebody could do that as a podcast and it would
just be four podcasts for the year, that would be your content, and you’d have a different
person each twelve weeks. There’s your content for the year! – Or, if you can, even
another spin on that would be, let’s say you
did four podcasts a year and you know the four guests you want and you could ask each of the four guests a different question,
sorry, the same question, and then what you’ll do is you’ll say, for idea’s sake, “Podcast
one, we’re focusing “on mental wellbeing.” So then you say, “This
is what Guest One had “to say about it. “This is what Guest Two
had to say about it.” And what you’re doing is you’re focusing the content of your guests across the year into episodes. So first we’re doing mental wellbeing. – So you could do all four. – Second we’ll do physical wellbeing. Thirdly we’ll do how they work together. And of the four guest, they’ll appear across the series as opposed to, “This month we’ve got so-and-so, “next month we’ll have so-and-so.” You can say, “We’ve got all four guests “across the four years,
across the whole year, “and we’re going to ask them exactly “the same question and
take their responses “and see how they differ.” ‘Cause if they’re all experts, they’ll all have their own view of how to implement those changes in the real world. – Wow, just a little
vignette of the contest that we’re talking about. We’re gonna be doing online calls first, inviting you to learn some
basics about podcasting, what kind of equipment to use, that kind of thing, but then we’re also doing a studio-based, full day intensive where Stef would walk you through how to launch your own
podcast and everything. So details coming soon about that, but if you are interested
in finding out more, pop your name below so that we can send you a message and
make sure that we let you know about what’s gonna be
happening in the future. It’s gonna be exciting stuff. – Definitely, yeah, really exciting. – See you later!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *