Pro Tools Workspace | How to use Pro Tools First to Edit Podcast | Pro Tools First Tutorial 2019

Pro Tools Workspace | How to use Pro Tools First to Edit Podcast | Pro Tools First Tutorial 2019


Hey there
everyone and welcome to a Pod Sound School tutorial, all about getting started in Pro
Tools First and Configuring Our Workspace. If you haven’t already downloaded Pro Tools
First, it is free. Just go to avid.com where you can find the
Pro Tools First download. I’m very excited that Pro Tools has a free
version now, and I think it is a perfect solution for podcasters and really anybody who wants
a free digital audio workstation. It is superior to garage band and audacity
when it comes to a free DAW because it’s Pro Tools and hey Pro Tools is the industry standard
for a reason. Definitely download it and give it a try. Stick through some of these tutorials, get
up and running in Pro Tools First, you won’t regret that you did it. Okay, let’s get started. So if you see here I am working on a Mac Pro
laptop. If you’re just getting started on a Mac, you’ll
more than likely have to adjust some settings in your keyboard and your keyboard shortcuts,
so that Pro Tools First will work properly. We do that by going to system preferences
and inside of system preferences we find the keyboard, in keyboard we go down to where
it says, “Use F1, F2 two e.t.c., keys as standard function keys.” We want to select that. That will allow these function keys to operate
as standard function keys. And lastly, while we’re in the keyboard window
of system preferences, we’re going to click on shortcuts and on shortcuts we’re going
to go down to where it says, “Spotlight,” here in the left window and where it says,
“Show spotlight search,” we’re going to deselect that. You’ll notice that next to it, it gives us
the quick key, which is command space. Command space bar in Pro Tools is the quick
key for record. We don’t want to open up spotlight on our
Mac every time we try to put Pro Tools and record. Okay, so let’s go ahead and open up Pro Tools
First. Okay. Now the first thing that shows up is dashboard. The dashboard is [inaudible 00:01:55] here. This defaults, every time we open Pro Tools,
it gives us the option to create or open a session that we’ve already created. You can also create from a template. These templates that are here are music templates,
but if you can also create your own templates, but here we’re simply just going to type welcome
to Pro Tools and we’re going to say create and here we go. Now we are in Pro Tools First. Let’s go ahead and take a look and familiarize
ourselves with these windows. The first we see here is edit. This is the edit window. Here we will see the wave form displayed when
we create an audio track and there’s a timeline here. This timeline corresponds to the time that
passes, or the time that we’ve been recording. Over here we have a mix window. This mix windows where we’ll see our virtual
mixer with the faders that we’re actually able to adjust and make a mix of the different
tracks we record. And down here we have the transport control. This transport is a standard transport where
you have go to the beginning of this session, you have stop, play, and record. So those are your standard transport controls. Now so that we can see better how some of
these windows work, I’m going to go ahead and set up an audio track. Let me show you how to do that. The most intuitive way to do that is to go
to the dropdown menu up here where it says, “Track,” and say, “New.” But before we just click on that, I want you
to come over here and notice that it gives us the quick key for how to set up a new track,
which is shift, command, N and for new. So rather than click on this here, I want
us to memorize shift, command, N, because that is going to be the most common quick
key that we’ll be using. So I’m going to go ahead and press shift,
command, N, which brings up the new track window. Here, it will always default as one mono audio
track. You can change the number here, one, to different
numbers. You can also change mono to stereo here. And instead of an audio track you can do an
aux input, a master fader, a MIDI track or an instrument track. We’re going to go ahead and stick to one mono
audio track and I’m going to go ahead and create that. Now, what I want you to notice here is it
says, “Audio one.” That’s the name of our track is always good
practice to immediately name your tracks, once you open them up. I’m going to go ahead and name this Studio
Steve with the idea that I’m going to record my voice here. Now let’s take a look at what we have in this
window. We have a record button. This will record, enable our track. We have an input button, this will allow us
to hear the input of what’s coming through the track. Solo, will solo up the track and then we also
have a mute. I think those are pretty intuitive and pretty
easy to understand. Underneath that it’s going to tell us what
the track will display over here. Right now it’s set to wave form. It will display the wave form of the audio
we record. Underneath this polyphonic and auto read,
those you don’t need to worry about right now. Just leave them the way they are. Over here we have something that says, “Collab.” This is the window that has to do with whether
or not this is being saved or downloaded to your cloud and this comes in handy if you
are going to collaborate with people in within your Pro Tool session. That’s not something we’re going to get into
for a while with these tutorials. So I’ll show you how to go ahead and get this
off of your edit window when we get into configuring. And then here you have your IO, this shows
you the built in microphone. Right now is what it’s displaying. That’s the built in microphone from my laptop. Down here it says, “Built in output.” That’s the built in output of my laptop, which
means it will send the output to the two speakers on each side of my keyboard. Now if you ever forget, which either one of
these boxes are, if you click on it, you can see up here it says, “No input.” This is your input. That’s where you can set and change your input. So if you have an interface set into your
computer, you will see it show up here. Now, normally right here you would also see
my Blue Yeti microphone I’m talking in show up, but I’m using the blue microphone in screen
flow to record this tutorial, so it’s not showing up right now. Okay, so that is our edit window. Now, let’s quickly look at our mix window. Now that we have set up a track, we can see
our mix window over here. It has very similar functions here. It has inserts, sends our collab and the same
input and output, so if I adjust something here, and I say no input, you’ll also see
that it made that adjustment there as well. For this reason, it is very common for people
and myself included not to always have the IO here on the edit window and only have it
over here on the mix window. That’s where we get into configuring and how
you want to configure your Pro Tools workspace. You have your record, your solo, your mute,
your input monitor and then your volume meter. If you look over here, you can see the volume
adjusting here as I adjust it over here in the mix window. Also, if you click on the volume here, it
gives you a little teeny fader guy right here that you can adjust right here from the edit
window. That’s why a lot of people like to have this
IO box here, so that they can adjust the volume, make adjustments to the inputs without having
to switch over to the mix window. Now let’s get into how to configure our workspace
a little bit, so that it’s most comfortable for how we like to work. When it comes to my edit window, I like to
have an edit window that’s nice and big. So for that reason I like to stretch it out
and when it comes to this transport, I very seldom use this transport. And that’s because all of these controls are
up here that I can use and there’s quick keys that will bring us to the start of the session
that will play and stop and record. So I don’t need this transport. So I go ahead and close it out. If you ever want that transport back, you
just go up to the window, dropdown here and there’s your transport. You can get it back, but I go ahead, and I
kill the transport. Now I have a nice open space to see my wave
forms and to make them big. Now as I mentioned before, this collab right
here, I’m not going to be collaborating with anybody as for the time being, so I’m going
to go ahead and go up here to view and then it says, “Edit window views.” Here is where I can adjust what will show
up on my edit window, so I’m going to go ahead and kill the track collaboration. Now if you wanted here to say comments, so
that you can write a comment about each track, what microphone you’re using on the track
or anything else you might want to know. You can leave that there as well. The comments will show up over on our mixed
window, as you can see down here, and we can choose whether or not we want those comments
on mix window views right here under the view tab. I like to keep my comments on the mix window
view, so I’m going to go ahead and turn those off here. Now, some people and myself won’t have this
IO here, but this IO, if we didn’t want it there, we would just say, “Edit window views,”
and kill the IO right there. I’ll go ahead and leave it here so that we
can have this volume control here. Now, I’m going to go ahead and record some
audio by record enabling here and then I wanted to teach you about the first quick key, which
is command space bar, if you remember me saying that from the beginning. Now I’m just going to talk for a minute and
say that the reason I like to use the quick key rather than use this up here is because
it skips a step and let me show you that step that it skips. I’ll go ahead and stop recording. If I were to press record here, not only would
my track have to be record enabled, then I would record enable here and then I would
press play or space bar anywhere along the timeline that I’m ready to record at, and
it would then record because I’ve record enabled it from the transport control. That to me is an extra step that I don’t like
to go through, so I go ahead and just simply have my tracks that I’m going to record on,
record enabled and press command space bar. So as I mentioned now my mix window is nice
and open, and I can zoom all the way in on my wave forms, and I have a lot of space to
edit and control my way forms. Now, there’s two different ways I can adjust
the track height here, so that I can see my way forms even better. The first is to go over to this dropdown menu,
where you’ll see track height, and I have some different options here. Micro would be very teeny, tiny or extreme
would be extreme. The other way to do it is to hover your mouse
right over the bottom of the track, and you will see this icon, an arrow pointing up and
arrow pointing down. This allows you to click and drag. I find that to be very convenient, so we’ve
got a nice big open waveform display here, where we can zoom all the way in. Now in the next tutorials I’ll be showing
you all about how these tools work, all about the modes of operation, how to zoom in, edit
cross fade, do all sorts of fancy things like that inside of Pro Tools. But for right now, we’re just getting into
configuring our workspace. The next thing I want to do is to configure
my mix window. Here comes the next very important quick key
that you must memorize, which is command equals. If you are on a PC, that would be control
equals, command equals toggles between our mix and our edit window. If you ever forget that, you can go to the
window menu here at the top, the dropdown menu and you’ll see it says, “Mix and edit,”
and then of course over here there’s a command equals. This is a way you can always see any of the
quick keys that you might need to find is simply by going to the dropdown menu and the
quick key will be displayed next. I definitely recommend learning as many quick
keys as you can and memorizing them, so you could be lightening fast in Pro Tools. So command equals toggles between our mix
and edit windows. You can see as I press it here. So I’m going to go ahead and take my mix window
and get a nice big open mix window like this. This is wonderful because this allows me to,
once I get many tracks going on, I have a big mixer, it feels great. I can make adjustments here, pan left and
right as I see fit and do all sorts of fancy things there. And now I have Pro Tools set up the way I
like it. We’ve configured it really nicely. You can see that by going to view here, you
can configure it by mix window views and edit window views and you can have anything you
want either in your mix window or your edit window. Anybody who uses Pro Tools is going to use
it differently. They’re going to customize it to the way they
like to work. I’ve seen many Pro Tools wizards barely use
this mix window at all. They like to have everything set up here just
in their edit window, so they have the volume controls, they have everything else and they
don’t really get over into the mix window. And like I said in the following tutorials,
we’re going to cover the tools, we’re going to cover the modes of operation and it’s going
to be a whole lot of fun. Pro Tools First has the same layout and the
same basic functions as the professional versions of Pro Tools, so when you upgrade later you’ll
already know how it works. This is a great intellectual asset to add
to your enterprise and I can’t recommend it enough, take the time now to learn Pro Tools
First, come back and check out these other tutorials and we’ll help you get started here
at the Pod Sound School. Thank you so much for tuning in today and
happy casting.

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