PODCAST OR RADIO? Danny Robins PT2 PODCAST PRODUCER TIPS with Neil Mossey 009

PODCAST OR RADIO? Danny Robins PT2 PODCAST PRODUCER TIPS with Neil Mossey 009


I think the podcast world gives you a lot
of freedoms that radio doesn’t. I mean on the very basic literal level things
like you know an episode doesn’t have to be 27 minutes 48 seconds or whatever the BBC
limit is… and you know you can have as many episodes as you want, and you can tell your
story in a slightly different way, and you know you don’t have to kind of adhere to kind
of the censorship of not having swearing and things for that you know.
So I think I think it’s interesting for anybody who’s making audio I think now that the field
has opened up massively I feel like it’s — There’s a slightly kind of wild-west quality
to it that I think it’s still… the podcast world is still even now trying to work out
what it is, and particularly how to make money out of it.
You said that when you had the idea for Haunted you kind of knew immediately that this wouldn’t
be right for radio. What was it about it that it didn’t feel right?
Yeah well I I mean I think that often one of the– because it’s a question that you’re
asked a lot about: “What is radio? What is podcasting?” and how they differ.
And I think one of the things is that a story that would be told in one half-hour on Radio
4, or even perhaps as a part of a half-hour can be told across many episodes as a podcast.
I think there’s some not only kind of like an ability to be more niche in podcasting…
There’s a desire for it you know like people lap up things about the niche and the specific…
the minutiae, and you know just these interesting stories.
I mean look at “S-Town” you know which for me is and for most people probably is
one of the greatest podcasts ever made you know.
That story of this man and his life where not a great deal happens but at the same time
it’s hugely kind of epoch changingly brilliant you know and that that really wouldn’t have
ever been commissioned on Radio 4 I don’t think it wouldn’t be.
I just don’t think that would ever have been a perception that that would fill you know
time on Radio 4 you know so I think that that’s for someone where you feel like you’ve got
stories to tell that you know you want to take the time over, podcasting is great.
You know on radio you probably have to really frame it around something like a programme
at Halloween about you know why do people see ghosts or you know it would be a one-off
thing about you know sort of as part of a sort of psychology season about why we see
ghosts. If you just said I want to do a series talking
to people about the fact they’ve seen ghosts I think that it would be perceived as too
light to sort of you know too intangible to sort of you know… frivolous maybe but um…
And yet… and yet it’s because of that frivolousness that allowed you to just follow stories and
and just present it to the audience. Yeah yeah yeah
Without a particular frame or an angle. Yeah totally I mean you know it and and you
know obviously the BBC has huge time constraints there’s a lot of people trying get a lot of
things on the BBC and you know the average Radio 4 Series I think is you know a maximum
of kind of three or four episodes on Radio 4 you know even sitcoms now kind of you know
quite often almost generally kind of four episode series now.
There’s a lot of things competing for a short amount of time.
Clearly in podcast land you have infinite time – is the one thing on your hand you know
so you’re not compelled to tell the story in the same kind of like truncated way.
I find myself making podcasts and thinking you know hold on I do you know I think that’s
the way I’d begin an episode in radio land you know that that’s not the right episode
to begin this. So I get all my interviews transcribed because
I like to be able to sort of pore through it and I sort of edit on paper but before–
I’m not I’m not technically good I can’t use sort of editing software on computers so I
do sort of my paper edit of all the stuff I’m using and I often find myself actually
not using some of the bits I transcribed and going for the kind of the bits of stuff that
just seemed like filler at the end, you know like the bit where the guy says you know:
“is this on” you know. I think when I interviewed you for Haunted…
yeah yeah and I ended up using the bits of you kind
of you know making sure you’ve had your tissues there, you know, because it’s an emotional
interview we did and you were worried that you might cry and you did cry…
And I did, on cue… …incredibly brave but but I do think those
moments you know like the fact that you knew it was an emotional interview you were talking
about losing someone you loved and you know that reaching for the tissues at the beginning
is a moment that felt incredibly powerful and that those – it’s those sort of moments
that would never make it into a radio programme. You’d never in the sort of you know fight
to fit everything in you’d be kind of locked in to kind of “we need to get all the kind
of really factual story stuff in there.” You wouldn’t have that incredibly revealing
character moment in there. So I think that those are things you can latch
onto as definite differences between podcast and radio.
That’s Danny Robins and this is the Podcast Producers Podcast with me Neil Mossey. It’s
a place where podcast producers share their tips and experiences so that everyone can
start the podcast and keep going. There’s details of how to subscribe in the description
– thanks so much for getting to this point in the podcast and thanks again to Danny the
links to him and his podcasts are in the description. And if you’ve got this far into the podcast
it’s really good to have you here. Why not give me a thumbs up, or a comment,
or tweet me. It’d be lovely to hear from you. And there’s also details in the description
for where you can find the next episode. Can you please help my daddy get 1000 subscribers
just click on his face thanks bye! [Music]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *