Iterative Marketing Podcast Ep. 35: The PESO Model

Iterative Marketing Podcast Ep. 35: The PESO Model


Hello Iterative Marketers!
Welcome to the Iterative Marketing Podcast where each week we give
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of your fellow Iterative Marketers. Now let’s dive into the show. Hello everyone and welcome to
the Iterative Marketing podcast. I’m your host Steve Robinson and with me as always is the
determined and gritty Elizabeth Earin. How are you doing today, Elizabeth? I am good, Steve.
How are you? Good.
I don’t mean gritty in the sense of – I was wondering when you said that. I’m reading
Angela Duckworth’s book Grit and it’s fascinating, so, definitely worth a pickup. I’ll talk about it more
when I’m further into it. So what’s new in your world? I have a 2-year-old,
so we are sick yet again. As are we in our family. I hope my voice continues for
the duration of this podcast because my children did
infect me again, so… It’s like we live in a petri dish, it’s just I don’t think we are
ever going to get better, maybe when they move out.
I have no clue. Well, I have got three kids, so I’m hoping that the third one
here is getting all the germs the other two can bring home and she’s going to have the most phenomenal
immune system by the time she’s 4 and I think we will be
smooth sailing from there. So what are we talking about today if
we not talking about sick children? We are going to talk
about the PESO model and we have referred to this
before in other episodes and we will refer to
it in the future and so given that we decided it was
probably a good idea to take some time and explain what it is and I’m really excited we
are talking about this. I mentioned this briefly to
you before the podcast but I was actually talking to a
gentleman last night, John, who has a startup that
he’s self funding and he called me last
night for some advice and we were talking and I said have you heard
of the PESO model and he said, no, and I said, well, perfect because we
are recording a podcast on it tomorrow, so I will forward you the episode
as soon as it’s recorded, but this really covers each
of the different areas, paid, earn, shared, and owned. Sorry, thought I said that
backwards for a second and I think it’s important and it’s where
a lot of marketers get hung up and so I’m very excited that we
are talking about this today. Yeah, absolutely. I mean it’s really
underused by marketing. I think that it came out of PR
and it’s underused by marketing and I think it’s a great great asset and I’m looking forward
to the discussion today especially the part where you go
through the pros and cons of each particular
aspect of the model – paid, earned, shared, and owned. And when each one shines, right? So you can layer them appropriately
based on your objectives. But before we do that you are going to get into a bit of the
background of where it came from and I’m excited about this because as I was speaking
with John last night unfortunately I think a lot of
marketers have this idea that specifically when we talk about
public relations and press releases that our press releases
this magical document that is going to help get their company
all of this fame and fortune and unfortunately sort of the
model and how we operate in and the world in
general has changed and so that one document
doesn’t necessarily – it’s more than just the
words on the paper, there’s a lot more behind it and we are going to talk a
little bit about that today. Yes and for those PR pros that have been
around the block and have lived this because it was their world, if I make any misstatements here, please email us at
[email protected] with some corrections, will get them out in
a future episode because I have worked around
PR professionals much of my career but I haven’t actually been
in the trenches. So if I misspeak please
send the correction. And I was in the trenches but I was in the trenches a while
ago and for a short period of time, so I definitely don’t
have the expertise that I am sure some
of our listeners do. So, here’s where PESO came from. It really came out of an
evolution in the PR industry and has since started to gain a little
bit of traction in marketing overall. It really comes back to a time period – there was an inflection point that
occurred kind of around 2008 where public relations had a huge sort
of change and identity crisis all at once. And prior to 2008-ish the
world was different, you really had basically two to
three houses of marketing, right? You had your paid and your earned
and those were obvious. Paid is when money is exchanged
for getting your message out and then earned is when no money is
exchanged for getting the message out. So publishers would try
and cater to this as well and try to make sure that they were
separating their houses internally, at least the good publishers, right? would make sure that there was a wall
down the middle of the publisher’s house that you had ad sales on one side
that handle the paid end of things and then you had editorial
on the other side and you wanted to make sure that your
paid wasn’t influencing your editorial. And thank you for
clarifying good houses because anyone who’s worked in PR knows that there are those
ones that you want to avoid, that aren’t exactly playing aboveboard
and there’s a lot of tit-for-tat. So thank you for calling that out because that is something that I think
all PR professionals have endured. Yes, yes. It was the ideal, right? And then there is this third
house called owned media and owned media has
sort of stood on its own. This was the opportunity for a brand
to develop its own voice, its own megaphone, build its own audience
through its own publishing and prior to 2008-ish that wasn’t
that big of a deal anyway because it was expensive, you had a launcher on news platform
your own like literally print publication but as blogging came online in particular as branded
blogs came online all of a sudden every brand
could be a publisher and if it built up enough
of an audience it really could develop an
owned media channel and so owned became
a thing as well and for a long time this is really
how public relations operated. They stayed within
their earned channel and maybe dabbled and owned
for the brands that could work until things started to change and there were a lot of things that
contributed to these changes. As I mentioned, blogging came on and
that really amplified that owned component as well as giving everyday people the opportunity to launch
their own media platforms and now all of a sudden
you had citizen journalists and where did they
fit into this model. Social media gave
everybody even further voice because now you didn’t have to know
HTML and launch a blog but now you could just start
pushing stuff out into the world and so now your consumers actually
have a voice and an audience, where do they fit into this model. Well and I remember back in probably
2005-2006 working for a very large brand and having that conversation do
we get involved in social media? Do we set up a Facebook page? And whose responsibility is it? And we literally
went back and forth, me and marketing, our advertising
manager and our PR manager and kind of sort of
argued who owned it and none of us wanted it because none
of us really understood it at that point and so that kind of added
an extra little hiccup there. It was a challenge. And a lot of public relations
professionals were like, well, isn’t social just basically earned
only with smaller audiences? Isn’t it the same thing? And others would push back and
say no, it’s its own animal, it’s completely different and this is also back at a time when you publish something
on Facebook as a brand, it actually got read. So it was a channel
for pushing out content as well the kind of sourced
out the owned bucket. So it got really, really muddled and it didn’t help as well
that the publishing model was starting to break down as well, so you had publishers
that were folding, you had journalists moving
around constantly, so all the relationships that these
public relations professionals had built up over the years
weren’t quite as valuable because the journalists
weren’t staying put and it became harder to
monetize those relationships as well as those walls were
falling between editorial and sales and now we have branded
content coming out and content studios are
launching within publishers and all of a sudden,
it’s like, well, what’s the difference between
paid and earned now? And all of this really led to
sort of an identity crisis because public relations
was looking at the fact that now a lot of them had owned social, the algorithms were forcing them
to turn that into a paid channel where they weren’t
supposed to be playing, the walls between paid and earned
were falling with the publishers and they needed a new model and thankfully one of the
more prolific personalities or influencers within
public relations, Gini Dietrich launched a book called Spin Sucks. There were a couple of other books
coming out about the same time about this evolution of PR, but Gini proposed a model called the PESO model
that we are talking about, today that really allowed public relations
to escape its little earned hole and look at marketing more
holistically as it went to do its job. So that I think is a great summary of
sort of how this evolution has occurred, if we haven’t lost any
of our listeners yet then now I know we mentioned earlier but PESO what it actually stands for is
Paid, Earned, Shared, and Owned. Yeah. And let’s go through what each
of those actually means, right? So they are all channels
or groups of channels that we can use to
reach our audience and by putting them
into these buckets we are able to look at our marketing
efforts through a different set of lenses depending on what our objectives are and understand the different
ways we could go about getting our messages
to our audience, right? Yeah, definitely and the different
opportunities that exist because even as we sort of look
at these four channels, there is a lot of
crossover between them, they are not distinct and separate and we are going to talk about
that in a little bit as well. Why don’t we define
what each one is? Do you want to start with paid? Sure. So paid advertising,
you mentioned this earlier, but it’s when money is exchanged
for getting our message out there, whether it’s an ad or content, we are paying someone to help us
distribute that to our target audience. And earned is exactly
the opposite of that. It’s when we are able to trade
the value of the content itself to reach an established
authority’s audience and I think that established
authority’s part is important because it’s sort of what
separates a media outlet from any old customer of ours, right? So they have to have an audience, they have to have some
authority within that audience and we give them
some great content off of that great content they turn
around and distribute that content and give us a mention or even
play some of our messaging. The next one, shared, is kind of
touches on earned a little bit in that an audience is
sharing our content, they are putting it out. There the difference is that
this is our own audience and they could be sharing
content that we have created, they could be sharing ads. We see that all the time. I remember when I first had my son, I think it was Johnson & Johnson
came out with one of their tearjerker ads about moms and it was a full-on advertisement it was a commercial that they shot and I shared it with my
network of moms like crazy because that really
resonated with who I was and so it can be content or it can
be an ad that’s been created. Yeah and this is the area where I
think there’s a little bit of ambiguity and not everybody is on the same
page as to what shared means because, as a distribution channel, that can also kind of include the
brand’s own social media properties and the brand sharing stuff on social on the hopes that it gets then
re-shared and distributed. That’s harder to do these days
without paying money, so it falls kind of more
into paid these days but again that kind of comes
into the gray area, right? Yeah, there’s definitely
some crossover there. But the point is that
it’s everyday people, it’s not media outlets that are
sharing this or influencers or bloggers with huge audiences, it’s normal everyday customer. And don’t – There’s still a power there. I may not have a network of 100,000
or 300,000 people on my Facebook page but I share it with other people
who have like interests to me and they share with the network and it’s just this exponential burst of
brand awareness that goes out there to ideally your target audience because a lot of times we are
hanging out with people with like interests to our own. And we’ll talk about this more when
we get to the pros and cons, but there’s also a higher
level of trust. I mean — Definitely. — I am sure that your
sisters trust your word more than they trust Parents magazine
or some other mommy blogger or even the New York Times. I think it depends on which sister
you talk to, but potentially, potentially. The last one is owned. So, the O in PESO is owned media,
we talked about that earlier, that’s when you actually control
the platform and the audience. So you are building up
your own audience that comes to you to
seek out your content, so they are subscribed
to your newsletter or they have another means of
getting your content when they want to and you don’t have to pay
for that distribution. So let’s provide some examples to help I think put this into
better context for our listeners. When we are talking about paid we are
talking about print and online ads, we are talking about outdoor,
advertising, sponsored stories, native advertising falls into
this category as well. Earned is going to be coming
back to more traditional PRs, your press mentions,
your influencer relations, even investor relations could be
considered earned media. I think we are going to
talk about this later, so I don’t want to go
too far into it, but again none of these–very few of
these are specific to just this one channel that they are talking about and influence relations I think is
a really good example of this where there’s crossover between paid and some of our paid and shared and so we are going to get
into that a little bit later. These aren’t necessarily distinct
buckets that don’t have any crossover. So your shared is going to be your,
these are your own brands, social accounts because they are means to get stuff out
there to be re-shared and re-tweeted, etc. Other examples would be like
sweepstakes that you run where people have to go and
share content to participate or other efforts to encourage
sharing of your own content, online reviews would
fall into this area as well as even basic
referral programs, trying to spark that word-of-mouth,
it really falls into that shared bucket. And then owned is – exactly, it’s
the channels that you own, the channels that you control that
no one can take away from you or shouldn’t be able to
take away from you. It’s going to be things
like your blog, it’s going to be your podcast
and print magazines. Anyone who is a Costco member,
you get that monthly Costco. Costco Connection. Costco Connection, yeah and it’s their publication
and that’s owned by them and that’s something that they
control all of the content and all of the messaging that
goes with in that publication. So if we were to put this in the context
of like a fictional scenario, right? What would this look like? So if we are talking about
let’s say a charity looking to raise donations
for medical research, they could apply the PESO model
to help round out and create a very comprehensive
marketing program that touches in each of these areas and I think you came up with it sort of
an idea for a campaign of your own, would you like to share
your brainstorm here? Sure, sure You don’t want to take credit
for my fictitious campaign here? That I totally blatantly ripped off
the ice bucket challenge? I will let you do that, yeah. So let’s throw this fictitious
campaign out there. We’ll call it Purple Hair for the Cure, where people pledge and go with their
friends into dying their hair purple to get the word out
about some treatment or raising money for research
on some medical treatment. If we looked at this
fictitious scenario, you’d have a paid channel to get
things started for sure, right? So, you would have to put together
some online advertising to get the word out
about the program, otherwise nobody’s going
to know about it. So this could include banner ads,
video promotion, maybe some Outbrain or Tabula
placements of some blog content in order to get that sponsored
content out there as well in order to get kind of
ignite the challenge. And then moving into earned, you’d be looking at press relations, so you are hoping to get a story
about the campaign on the Ellen Show or on your local news,
out to your local paper or perhaps a blogger that has a connection
to this specific medical treatment, get them to write about it. Shared media would
include doing things like building a call to action
into the campaign, encouraging those people participating to in order to really qualify to
share their purple hair online, maybe in some public prominent
place or something fun like that. So you are building in that shared
component into the campaign itself to try and amplify the message among
those people that are participating. And then owned is going to
include the official website, the Purple Hair for the Cure website that is going to include
information about the campaign, it’s going to include touching
videos of other people who have raised funds for this, this is the one that always gets me
every time and makes me cry, but people why they have
contributed to this, why they have dyed their hair purple and sort of the personal
connection that it has to them as well as regular updates
on fundraising goals and then there’s an ability there for
visitors to subscribe to get emails, updates as well as information
for making donations. I want to circle back and something that Elizabeth
brought up a couple of times, there is gray area, not everything fits cleanly
inside a one bucket. And I think the greatest poster
child is influencers, right? Because if you have done any
work in influencer marketing, you know that that’s kind of both a
paid channel and an earned channel. You are not going to get an influencer
that doesn’t believe in your product, it’s not a good match if they don’t, but at the same time most of those
influencers expect to be compensated to be giving you those mentions
and getting your name out there. So it falls on both sides of that bucket. And one more thing before, I know we are
getting ready to head to a charity break, but one more thing I want to say is any one of these channels
on their own has power and it’s great, but when you combine
all four of them together you have created a
comprehensive program that is touching people along
multiple touch points in their day, they are hearing about
it from their friends, they are seeing it
on their local news, banner ads are popping up and now you have really created
something that they cannot ignore that they would have to literally
be living under a rock to not understand what the
purple hair challenge is. So without further ado,
let’s go and help some people. Before we continue I’d
like to take a quick moment to ask you Iterative Marketers
a small but meaningful favor and ask that you give a
few dollars to a charity that’s important to one of our own. This week’s charitable cause was
sent in by an anonymous listener. This listener asks that you make a
contribution to 4 Paws For Ability, an organization dedicated to enriching
the lives of children with disabilities and veterans by training and placing quality
task-trained service dogs. Learn more at 4pawsforability.org
or visit the link in the show notes. If you would like to submit
your cause for consideration for our next podcast please visit
iterativemarketing.net/podcast and click the Share a Cause button. We love sharing causes that
are important to you. And we are back. So before the break we went through a long and
rambling history of public relations to finally get to what
the PESO model was, we gave you a few examples
so we could make it tangible. Now let’s talk about how you should
decide where to really put your efforts for a given marketing program, which channel groups or channels
are going to work well for you under certain circumstances or others. Do you want to start off with
some of the pros to – we will start with paid and you
want to start with some of the pros, maybe you can be the
pro person, Elizabeth, I’ll be the con person,
I’ll stay in the negative camp. Oh! Okay, someone is going to
get to be so positive here. So when we are talking
about paid media, one of the really fabulous benefits
of this is it’s very scalable, the more money you spend the
more distribution you have and so if you have
got a limited budget you can really use this to help
define and create a program that fits within the budget
that you have, but then still reaches
your audience and there’s a lot of different
ways that you can scale this, whether it’s based on the
audience that you are targeting, the geography that you are targeting,
the frequency of your advertising, but again it’s very scalable. The other thing is it’s very reliable, you know you are creating these ads,
you are putting them out there so you know that you are
getting guaranteed exposure for the exact message that you
want people to be receiving and finally it’s fast especially when
we are looking at digital media, media that you place today is going to
be in front of your audience today. Print advertising obviously can have
a little bit of a longer lead time but again it’s very quick and you can
decide the timeframe that it’s running. It’s up to you when that
appears in market. Now, there are cons to
paid advertising as well. So when you look at your
paid channel, its lower trust. Everyone’s a little bit skeptical
when they see an ad, they know it’s an ad, they are not necessarily going to
believe it at least not on the surface, so it’s not as effective as other
channels from that standpoint. It can be expensive
particularly if you try to scale it. So as you reach more audience
it’s going to cost you more. So if you need to get something out to
a broad group of Americans or even globally you are going to have to pay for that. I think one of the biggest downfalls
is its very ephemeral. When you stop paying for advertising it doesn’t take very long for the
benefits to start to wear off, you are going to have some
residual brand equity but the ads go offline, people are going to stop
clicking on them, that newspaper gets
tossed in the garbage, people are going to
stop looking at it. So when you turn off the tap the
water stops flowing right away. When we look at earned media there are definitely some
benefits to using that as well and the first one and I think this is the one that sort of
pops out when we first talk about this is it’s very authoritative, it’s not just you talking
about your brand, someone else is coming
in and saying, yes, this is something that you
should be paying attention to, it’s giving you some third-party
authority that money cannot buy and so there’s definitely a benefit
of the authority benefit side attached to earned media. One of the others is that
it’s cost-effective, you have the ability to leverage the size
and trust of a very established audience and my friend, John,
who I was speaking with last night, national publication, within the industry, they are targeting
is giving them a write-up, so this falls under earned media. They are an unestablished company and now someone is coming and saying,
hey, take notice of these guys. That’s not something that they can buy. That’s not something that has –
it doesn’t have that trust behind and now this audience is going to say
this publication I trust trusts this company, I should check them out and then finally there’s some
long-term benefits of it. Unlike the digital media
or paid media, when it stops running,
it sort of disappears, past press mentions or placements
can be live on forever, they can be referenced and really
create some long-term SEO benefits, so there’s definitely some long-term benefits
associated with your earned media. And of course with all of the
pros there are the cons. So there are downsides to
your earned media as well. It’s not as reliable. You can’t really guarantee
a press mention and particularly if you start to get into
more of your commercial type messages it could fall flat altogether. So it’s somewhat hit or miss, certainly the better relationships
you have with the press and the better your,
PR hates the word ‘pitch’, but the better your content is,
the more likely it’s going to get placed but it’s still a gamble and then other cons include
that it can be hard to scale, so it’s not like if you just put more
money or more effort towards PR, you are automatically going to get that
much more reach or impressions, it’s going to top off at some point. There are a limited number of outlets
that are going to run with your story and then you are done, right? And well it can be very cost effective. It can also be a bit expensive if
you are going outside to get it done. So, it’s not expensive in the
actual like media dollars, it’s expensive in time and resources and so if you are doing
it yourself internally, it’s going to be a big-time suck, if you are going outside you are going to have to pay some
public relations professionals money to do this on your behalf
with limited guarantees and what they are going to accomplish. Thank you for mentioning this because I feel like a lot of, especially small businesses think
that earned media is free media, but it’s not, you may not be necessarily paying the
dollars to get your message out there, but there is a big-time investment
especially if you are doing this right, there is a big-time investment in
making those connections, building those relationships and getting that media placed
or that message placed. I think the key to understand is it’s not a direct correlation between the
amount of time or money you put in versus the amount of reach
and benefit and trust and message you are
going to get out, it really depends back on like
the value of that content and then the relationships of the
person who is putting that to work, right? So if you have got
high value content and you are either working with
the public relations professional, who has great relationships or you personally have
great relationships, you are going to get that much
more bang for that time investment than if you are working with content
that maybe is more commercial in nature or isn’t as valuable or isn’t as good
or you don’t have the relationships. Jumping into shared media, there is a
very high level of trust in shared media and you touched on this earlier but people trust their peers more than
they are going to trust media or an ad, even more than they may trust the
earned media that you are getting. A recommendation from a friend
or a parent or a co-worker, someone who’s in a similar situation
who they trust and know and understand is going to have a much higher
value to them than a publication or even paid advertising. Also there’s low-cost, the ability to amplify your
message is tied to its quality and not necessarily
the dollars behind it and so again if you are
putting out great content that is of interest to your audience then while there is a cost
of producing that content, you can get it out and reach
people in a way that if you were trying to do this through
paid could cost you quite a bit of money. But along with that really cost-effective reach is the flip
side of that is it’s really unreliable. I don’t know how many clients
come to us and said, well, can we produce a viral video? And the answer is, no. We can produce
a really great video and we can do our research
to set everything up so that we think this is along the
lines of something that could go viral but at the end of the day
there have been studies to really get into the probability
of something going viral and being a shared media success and it’s really unpredictable,
really unreliable and it really comes down to
chaos theory and chance. So it’s not something
you can count on. It’s also unscalable. It’s not a matter of, well, if we just
produce more media or more content then that means that we are going to
get more shared amplification and it doesn’t work that way, you are limited based on
the audience that you have and their audiences as
they share their content and you are only going to get the
reach that you are going to get. And finally looking at the last – owned. Owned media is low risk in that you own
that channel that you are talking on, so you can’t be shut down by the
medium when its policies change or the platform dies. If the algorithm changes — there’s no algorithm
that’s going to change. It’s going to impact whether
or not your content is being seen. So, very low-risk, it’s something that you own and also it’s a long-term asset. Again you own it and so the evergreen content
that you are creating today is going to draw audiences as
long as the content is relevant and your audience will continue to serve
you as long as you nurture that audience and so this is really
a long-term asset and you have talked about long-term
assets in past podcasts and blog posts, we will link to that
in the show notes, but definitely a pro of owned media. Owned media has one huge
con though: It’s slow. In other words if you don’t
have an audience today, you are looking at six months to
a year to build that audience to the point where you can
really put it to work and so this is not something you
can just turn on overnight and it’s going to take time. The other thing is owned media
cannot operate in a silo, it’s not just build it
and they will come, right? You are going to have to pay
for some distribution at least early in the life cycle
of the owned media in order to build that audience, at some point that audience
will refer others and it will start to
grow organically but in the beginning if
nobody knows about it, nobody’s going to be talking about it and nobody else is going
to know about it. So you are going to have
to layer on some paid, earned or shared
on top of your owned in order to be able to get
it to ignite or grow. Thank you for mentioning these because I think in my experience
and talking to some of our clients and clients I have had in the past this is the biggest misconception. It’s not a build it
and they will come. It’s build it and do a bunch of other
work and then they’ll start coming, but there’s that step in
between that has to happen before that audience is going to
start to interact with the content. So how can we as marketers take this
PESO model and really put it to work for us? Well, I think the first thing we
need to keep in mind is we need to try not to limit
ourselves to our comfort zones. Yeah, I think all of us have a tendency
to be most comfortable and put the most effort in the bucket
the paid, earned, shared, or owned that we have the most experience and have experienced the
most success within and that can put on some blinders where we stop seeing the
opportunities in the other buckets and so by having the PESO
model at our disposal we can now take a look at
our efforts and say, where are there other opportunities? Where can I create synergies, where layering some
shared component on top of what I’m doing
from a paid component could amplify what we
are doing even further. Where can I introduce earned in addition
to paid, shared, and owned, right? So where can we layer this together in
order to really create something amazing. Yeah. To your point it
really does force us or I shouldn’t say necessarily force us, it gives us the opportunity to look
outside of our comfort zones and not only that but it gives us the
structure and the framework of what to do once we do that because again we are not exactly
sure where to start and the PESO models sort of
gives you those connections, it connects the dots for you so that it’s easy for you to categorize
and budget and allocate your resources in a way that you can
take steps forward. With that being said I do want to
take a step back and recognize that you don’t necessarily want to do
all of these at the same time either. If you have not done these before and you don’t have the
infrastructure setup and you don’t have
the content set up, trying to accomplish each of these is
not going to be a successful tactic. So it’s completely okay to start
where you are comfortable, it’s just don’t stop there, make sure you keep moving forward. And for us in the
context of this podcast and the writing that we do
on iterativemarketing.net we refer to the PESO model a lot in order to make sure that we
are not becoming myopic or putting on blinders in how
we talk about marketing and iterating on marketing. We want to make sure that we are
looking at marketing as a whole and not limiting ourselves
to just digital or not limiting ourselves
just to paid that we really are working to apply
continuous improvement across the gambit. So that brings us
to the end of a what has turned out to be
pretty long episode today. Thank you for sticking with us,
we appreciate it. Quickly just to summarize. Times have changed, it is not the same PR and marketing
world that was 10, 15 or even 20 years ago, and so we need to find a new model
to organize our marketing efforts and thankfully we have
that in the PESO model and then it gives us a great sense of
how we can look at our organization through different lenses
and find different opportunities to help to promote our
brand and our products. To reiterate, PESO stands for
paid, earned, shared, and owned and each channel has its
own set of pros and cons. The beauty comes when you start
to layer them on top of each other to make one compensate for the other. And we as marketers should be
open to adopting this model to help us put some order to what we
are doing every day in our marketing efforts and recognize that there are
other opportunities out there even if they scare us a little bit, it’s something that we may
want to use the PESO model to try and extend our marketing efforts
until we find appropriate mediums that really work to help
us get our message out. I want to thank everyone for
making time for us this week. If you did get this podcast
through a paid channel please come back to
our owned channel at iterativemarketing.net/podcast
and subscribe. If you are in the media and want
to mention us please feel free, we’d love the earned media and finally share our
podcast with your friends so that we can get some shared
media value out of this as well. Again, thank you all
for making time. Until next week
onward and upward. If you haven’t already, be sure to
subscribe to the podcast on YouTube on your favorite podcast directory. If you want notes and links to
resources discussed on the show sign up to get them emailed to you
each week at iterativemarketing.net. There you’ll also find
the Iterative Marketing blog and our community LinkedIn group where you can share
ideas and ask questions of your fellow Iterative Marketers. You can also follow us on Twitter. Our user name is @iter8ive or email us at
[email protected] The Iterative Marketing Podcast is
a production of Brilliant Metrics a consultancy helping
brands and agencies rid the world of marketing waste. Our producer is Heather Ohlman with transcription assistance
from Emily Bechtel. Our music is by SeaStock Audio,
Music Production and Sound Design. You can check them out
at seastockaudio.com. We will see you next week. Until then onward and upward!

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