How to Process Podcast Vocals in Logic Pro X

How to Process Podcast Vocals in Logic Pro X


– I get a lot of questions
about how I process my vocal recordings inside of Logic Pro X. Every voice is a little different. Every recording is a little different, but there are some common
steps and common processes that I follow to get great
audio from raw recordings, so in this video, I’m gonna
show you how I process my voice with only stock
plugins that are included with Logic Pro X, but
before we get into that, I just want to say this. The way to get audio that sounds great is not through processing. It helps, but you need
to invest in good gear, and a good microphone,
and a good interface. Have a pop filter and learn how to set input gain levels correctly,
and I’ll include links to the gear that I recommend,
and some other tutorials, in the description below,
but I just want you to remember this. You can’t turn a rock from
your backyard into a diamond, no matter how much you polish it. Invest in some good gear, and learn how to record clean audio. Let’s jump straight into the screen cast, and I’ll show you how I process
my voice in Logic Pro X. I went ahead and created a new project inside of Logic Pro X, and
I’ve got this track selected right here, I need to set an input source, so I’m gonna do that. Check, check, check. Input gain levels are coming
in around negative 12. That’s great, and so, now,
I’m gonna record enable, and do a quick test. Okay, so this is a quick test of my Shure Beta 87A microphone. Just wanted to record
myself talking for a second, so I could demonstrate
what this sounds like raw, and then how I process it in Logic Pro X, so this will be the end of the test. Bye. Okay, so now that I’ve got
this going, take a listen back, and see how it sounds. Okay, so this is a quick test of my Shure Beta 87A microphone. Just wanted to record
myself talking for a second, so I could demonstrate
what this sounds like raw, and then how I process it in Logic Pro X, so this will be the end of the test. Bye. It sounds pretty good. It sounds like, it sounds really good. I love this microphone. The levels are good. All in all, there’s not too
much I’d have to do to it to ship it, but there are
a few things that I can do to enhance it a little bit, so first, I’ll go ahead and click on
here to insert a plugin. I’m going to actually hold down option, and get one of the legacy plugins. You have to hold down option
to get to the legacy menu. I’m gonna choose speech
enhance, and what this does is removes some of the background noise. It’s got this little denoise
feature, and if you set it at right at about negative 40
dB, it does a really great job of just pulling some of the room sound, some of the line noise out of a track. You don’t want to go much
higher than negative 40, because it can start to
make your track sound weird, so let’s see if you can hear
a difference with this on or off. Okay, so this is a quick test of my Shure Beta 87A microphone. Just wanted to record
myself talking for a second, so I could demonstrate
what this sounds like raw, and then how I process it. Super subtle, but I always
start by removing some of the background noise,
if it’s noticeable. Okay, next, I’m gonna do some EQ. And I know after listening
to this mic for a while, that my voice is a little bit boomy between about 220 and about 400 hertz, so I’m gonna turn on the
analyzer and play this back. Okay, so this is a quick test of my Shure Beta 87A microphone. Just wanted to record
myself talking for a second, so I could demonstrate
what this sounds like raw, and then how I process it in Logic Pro X, so this’ll be the end of the test. Okay, sounds really good. I’m also gonna do a high pass filter, to cut off some of the
bass frequencies below about 90 hertz. Okay, so this is a quick test of my Shure Beta 87A microphone. Just wanted to record
myself talking for a second, so I could demonstrate
what this sounds like raw, and then how I process it in Logic Pro X. It doesn’t sound bad though. Okay, after that, I’m
gonna do some compression. This’ll just limit the
dynamics a little bit. Dynamics, as you can see,
they’re pretty consistent. There’s not a huge variety. That comes back to mic control. Okay, so for the compressor,
I’m gonna set the threshold around negative three. Let’s see, change this
to a peak compressor, so it means it will only
compress the loudest peaks of the audio, and then
I’m going to set the ratio to two to one, ’cause I’m
probably not gonna have too many peaks hitting
that, but just in case, and then I’ll add a
dB, turn auto gain off, leave release at about
50 milliseconds, or auto, actually. Auto’s great. Six milliseconds, yeah,
kind of a soft knee. Okay, so this is a quick test of my Shure Beta 87A microphone. Just wanted to record
myself talking for a second, so I could demonstrate
what this sounds like raw, and then how I process it in Logic Pro X. So you can tell that it’s
just doing a little tiny bit of compression here,
and that’s what I want. Okay, after the compressor, let’s see, I might throw
a deEsser on there, even though I don’t
hear a lot of sharp s’s. Sometimes s’s can be a problem,
usually around 5000 hertz, so we drop this down to
5000, put the strength to relatively low,
let’s say four decibels, sensitivity is 50 percent
is fine, let’s see. Okay, so this is a quick test of my Shure Beta 87A microphone. Just wanted to record
myself talking for a second, so I could demonstrate
what this sounds like raw, and then how I process it in Logic Pro X. Cool, just in case, and then, finally, I’m gonna finish out this
track with a limiter. So, an adaptive limiter from dynamics, and this’ll just make
sure that the output, because the audio runs through this track, from the top of the plugin
stack to the bottom, so it goes one at a time,
one, two, three, four, five, and then, after the last
plugin, you can control the volume right here, but it
gets sent to the master track, and that’s what people will
hear once you bounce out the track, so in this
case, I generally for MP3s set the output ceiling
to about negative 0.8, and then, I do a few
dB of additional gain. One way you can check is
that, well, let me see, right here, add a
metering, a loudness meter, and the common standard for
podcasts is negative 16 LUFS, so if you set this up right here, and you start playing your track back, okay, so this is a quick test of my Shure Beta 87A microphone. Just wanted to record
myself talking for a second, so I could demonstrate
what this sounds like raw, and then how I process it in Logic Pro X, so this’ll be the end of the test. Bye. You can either add some additional gain with your adaptive limiter, or you can do just a little
bit more compression, a little bit more makeup
gain on the compressor. This is a quick test of my Shure Beta 87A microphone. I generally don’t stress too
much about getting this level right here to negative 16. If I’m somewhere in the
ballpark, say, negative 18, and you can see that. Quick test of my Shure
Beta 87A microphone. Just wanted to record
myself talking for a second. If you’re in the ballpark, 16, 17, 18, you’re in good shape. So that’s pretty much it. Next step is just to bounce. If you want to bounce in
stereo, all you have to do is hit command A, click on the region, command A will select all
regions if you have more than just this one, and then command B, and you get a bounce dialog right here, so you can choose your bit
rate, 128 stereo’s great. If you’re gonna do it in mono, 96 is fine. Normalize on, if you
want to do it in mono, just go over that real
quick, you just change your stereo output track
to mono, by clicking on this little button right here. Make sure I’m doing this right, yeah, so if you hit X and open
up your mixer window, then you can actually see that. Click on one of these guys. Let’s see, you gotta grab
this endpoint right here, and drag it over, ’cause it’s gonna bounce what’s between the starting
point and the endpoint right here, and then you hit bounce. 96 kilobytes per second. Okay, anyways, let’s turn
these off, and listen to the difference, here. Okay, so this is a quick test of my Shure Beta 87A microphone. Just wanted to record
myself talking for a second, so I could demonstrate
what this sounds like raw, and then how I process it in Logic Pro X. Okay. Okay, so this is a quick test of my Shure Beta 87A microphone. Just wanted to record
myself talking for a second, so I could demonstrate
what this sounds like raw. It sounds a little hot. I would actually turn the
gain down just a little bit. Okay, so this is a quick test of my Shure Beta 87A microphone. Just wanted to record
myself talking for a second, so I could demonstrate
what this sounds like raw, and then how I process it in Logic Pro X, so this’ll be the end of the test. Okay, so this is a quick test of my Shure Beta 87A microphone. All right, so I’m pretty happy with it. So, that’s how I process tracks in Logic. If you have any questions,
drop them in the comments, below. If you’d like to learn more
about this kind of stuff, head over to the podcastdude.com or check out some of the other videos on my Youtube channel, hit subscribe. I’m actually. Wow, that’s noisy. I’m actually gonna be releasing a course for using Logic Pro X to edit podcasts called Logic Pro X for podcasters, where I’m gonna teach everything I know to help you edit podcasts
faster, make them sound good. It’s gonna be great, so if
you’re not subscribed yet, hit subscribe, or head over
to the podcastdude.com, and sign up for my email newsletter list, and that’ll get you the
best pricing on launch day, so hope you have a great day. Again, if you have any questions,
drop them in the comments, below. I’ll see you later.

34 thoughts on “How to Process Podcast Vocals in Logic Pro X

  1. Aaron is THE BEST 'how to' Podcast guy there is. His podcast is awesome, and now I've found his YouTube Channel and have subscribed. I wrote Aaron an email with a question about EQ, and he got back to me that same day with a great answer and a link to this video. Not only did his tutorial help me with working in Garageband, but this video (and other reviews I've now read) have convinced me to buy Logic Pro X for future podcasts. Thanks again Aaron, you rock!

  2. I did all the steps, it works very well for me with my Shure SM7B. Thank you very much. I also recommend to use a noise gate, it removes the small amount of noise, which remains after using the speech encancer. Use it very carefully, I set the Treshold about -75 db, very very low. If someone is interested to get my Logic Preset for a Shure SM7B without using a Cloudlifter, I can sent it to you, just write me in the commend section.

  3. I'm about to launch a podcast, and I have recorded the vocals for the first episode,. THIS is exactly what I was looking for. I'm excited to arrive home and try it! I'm sure that these tips will improve the sound.
    Suscribed.

  4. This is great thank you so much Aaron! For my podcast I bring in both vocal tracks from the conversation (me and my guest) to logic. Should I be using these processing techniques on each track individually or should do them both at the same time through the master (and how exactly would I go about doing that if so?). Also on your video about adding compression you say to set the peak compression threshold to -12db but in this video you said to set it to -3db. Is there a reason for the discrepancy?

  5. I appreciate your helpful and clear explanations, Aaron. I have a question however: for my voice over recordings, I don't need much EQ or compression and prefer a natural sound, but am interested in having an excellent processing quality in export (to mp3 or Wav). Do you think that Logic pro X will worth it and be more rewarding that Garageband or Studio one 3 for my use? Thank you for your time and answer.

  6. have to say the difference is minimal on YouTube …while stats for the video show you at -2.3dB which is just right to my ears.

  7. Finally someone using a sure beta for podcasts…these mics are underrated to me and have a sweet spot for high gain. They just sound great. Also I would make a preset setting and save as a template so it’s easy to dial in consistently. The best tracking sessions are well planned before your sessions and this helps get you started.

  8. YO this video was so helpful! I even got my voice to sound even better than yours in my opinion lol, I dont mean that in a mean way at all obviously – just saying that you are awesome and you helped me so much! This should have way more views!!

  9. I have clients who I edit podcasts for and their audio is less than stellar. Will this work to improve bad audio? I have been helping them improve their but they still can't seem to get it right.

  10. Hi, don't suppose you could help me. I'm trying to record a podcast with a friend, I have two xlr microphones set up on separate tracks in logic, they record fine but when I export the audio one mic sounds good but the other sounds faint, do you know why this could be?

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