First-ever prison-produced podcast ‘Ear Hustle’ lets you listen to real stories of incarcerated life

First-ever prison-produced podcast ‘Ear Hustle’ lets you listen to real stories of incarcerated life


JUDY WOODRUFF: Next: how a podcast is providing
an intimate look at life behind bars in California’s oldest prison. The audio series “Ear Hustle,” the first podcast
to be produced entirely inside a prison, has steadily grown in popularity by laying out
in vivid detail the everyday experiences of the inmates at San Quentin. Jeffrey Brown has our story. MAN: You are now tuned into San Quentin’s
“Ear Hustle.” MAN: What gives you hope in prison? MAN: Damn. Getting out, that’s all I can hope for. JEFFREY BROWN: On the popular podcast, “Ear
Hustle,” they call this yard talk. MAN: What does it mean to be institutionalized
in prison? MAN: Like, just being stuck in a rut. Even though that you know these things are
not right, but you’re still doing them, though. JEFFREY BROWN: For the inmates at San Quentin,
it’s a chance to be heard far beyond these prison walls. “Ear Hustle”‘s stories and the sketches by
inmates that accompany them offer a rare look at life inside a prison. The phrase is slang in here for eavesdropping. NIGEL POOR, Co-Host, “Ear Hustle”: How do
you take your coffee? MAN: I don’t usually drink coffee in here,
because I like don’t like to stay up. I like to sleep it off. JEFFREY BROWN: Sitting just north of San Francisco,
San Quentin is a California state facility that’s home to some 4,000 men, most under
medium security, but it includes more than 700 on death row. It’s a place known for its education and work
opportunities for prisoners, including a media lab, where we watched the show’s co-hosts
in action, inmate Earlonne Woods and Nigel Poor, a San Francisco-based artist who’s been
volunteering in San Quentin since 2011. NIGEL POOR: The purpose of the podcast is
to try to tell the everyday stories of life inside prison, and trying to find the commonalities
between what happens inside and what happens outside of prison. MAN: I did not realize that I could potentially
be facing life in prison. JEFFREY BROWN: “Ear Hustle”‘s stories can
be raw and intense about the realities of race relations, for example. MAN: You’re one with your race. If something happens between two races, everyone
is supposed to go, whether it’s fighting or whatever. JEFFREY BROWN: But there’s also plenty of
humor and relatable problems, such as sharing a tiny space, as in the episode called “Cellies.” MAN: You can’t walk by each other. One person either got to sit on his buck and
the other person can walk by. MAN: The rule is, don’t touch my stuff, don’t
look through my mail, don’t look at my pictures, do not put your hands on my shelf, because,
if you do, that’s like the ultimate form of disrespect. JEFFREY BROWN: Earlonne Woods, who has served
nearly 20 years on a 31-year-to-life sentence for attempted second-degree robbery, says
that “Ear Hustle” is a reflection of his own coming to terms. EARLONNE WOODS, Co-Host, “Ear Hustle”: As
you go through time, you have to get real with yourself and you have to come to the
conclusion, well, I did do this. You know, and I am accountable for my actions. And I think most people that are here that’s
been locked up over a decade are on that path, to where they’re trying to atone for whatever
may have happened in the past or just trying to find some type of understanding, you know? JEFFREY BROWN: Woods met co-host Nigel Poor
while she was teaching a photography class at San Quentin. The pair hit it off and quickly built an easy
rapport that has become the backbone of the show. NIGEL POOR: One of the original intents was
to show that inside and outside people can work together as colleagues with professionalism
and mutual respect. And I also can be the voice of the person
who doesn’t have experience in prison. So, I can ask the maybe embarrassing questions
or push Earlonne a little bit. JEFFREY BROWN: Last year, a pilot of the series
won an international contest put on by PRX’s Radiotopia that helped introduced “Ear Hustle”
to a much larger audience. Within a few months, it was at the top of
the iTunes podcast charts, and, to date, episodes have been downloaded more than six million
times. EARLONNE WOODS: We wasn’t trying to send no
messages, nothing like that. We were just, let’s tell some good stories. Let’s get some good people to tell stories. JEFFREY BROWN: Nigel Poor says finding good
stories at San Quentin has never been a problem. NIGEL POOR: There’s a lot of gossip inside
prison. JEFFREY BROWN: Yes. NIGEL POOR: So, it’s not hard to get the word
around that you’re looking for something specific. So, at this point, we can get people coming
to us and saying, I want to do this story. JEFFREY BROWN: For the podcast’s sound designer,
Antwan Williams, who is serving a 15-year sentence for armed robbery, the challenge
is to capture the feel of daily life here, including what he calls the sound of despair. What would despair feel like? What would it sound like? ANTWAN WILLIAMS, Sound Designer, “Ear Hustle”:
It can be just the sound of breathing by itself, with no interruptions, with no echoes or with
no chimes, just the sound of a breath. JEFFREY BROWN: “Ear Hustle” follows the long
tradition of inmate-produced content at San Quentin. The prison’s newspaper has been published
since the 1920s. CURTIS ROBERTS, Inmate: The first time I’m
eligible for parole is 2044. JEFFREY BROWN: One episode, called “Left Behind,”
included the story of Curtis Roberts, who is in his 23rd year after being sentenced
under California’s three strikes law. CURTIS ROBERTS: The crime I committed was
that I walked into a liquor store, I snatched two $20 bills out of the cash register, no
weapon. After I got caught for stealing the $40, I
pled guilty to burglary robbery, and they gave me 50 years to life. JEFFREY BROWN: Roberts says he eventually
felt safe enough with the “Ear Hustle” team to talk about something rarely spoken of:
He’d been raped inside San Quentin. CURTIS ROBERTS: They really helped me feel
comfortable and calm. And I never felt threatened. It was a comfortable environment. JEFFREY BROWN: What do you think is the biggest
misperception about people in prison? CURTIS ROBERTS: I think the perception is
that we’re these monsters in here. I am not a monster. I’m a stupid idiot that did drugs and stole
money. I’m still human, though. JEFFREY BROWN: Every “Ear Hustle” story, no
matter the topic, must be approved by Lieutenant Sam Robinson, San Quentin’s public information
officer. LT. SAM ROBINSON, San Quentin Public Information
Officer: I think, as a society, we’re responsible. We pay for what takes place behind the walls
of a prison. And you’re accountable for it. And so, if you’re accountable for it, you
should be informed about what that is. JEFFREY BROWN: Robinson says the only episode
he nearly prevented was titled “The Boom Boom Room” about conjugal visits, both legal and
illicit. MAN: At San Quentin, the married guys who
have them get to spend 48 hours with their family in a cottage on prison grounds. NIGEL POOR: OK, that’s the official, legitimate
way. But people being who they are, they’re going
to find a way to do their thing. LT. SAM ROBINSON: I have been here 21 years, so
I have… (LAUGHTER) LT. SAM ROBINSON: You know, it’s not the first
time that I have heard it. It’s not the first time that I’m aware of
illegal sexual activities taking place inside the prison. JEFFREY BROWN: “Ear Hustle”‘s creators say
they have been overwhelmed by the response to the series so far. But I asked Woods what he’d tell those, including
victims of crime, who might question his freedom to do this work. EARLONNE WOODS: Everybody has their truth,
you know? Even the victims and the survivors that you’re
speaking of, they have their truth, whether we should have this or not. But I believe that the whole purpose of the
Department of Corrections or prisons is for one to correct themselves. So, if the underlying reasons is for us to
correct ourselves, there should be some type of rehabilitative services. JEFFREY BROWN: Woods and the rest of the team
are now at work on season two of “Ear Hustle,” set for next march. For the “PBS NewsHour,” I’m Jeffrey Brown
in San Quentin Prison, California.

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