Eana Mokri – The LearnNa’vi Podcast – Episode 06: “Professional Podcast”

Eana Mokri – The LearnNa’vi Podcast – Episode 06: “Professional Podcast”


I shall cowboy open up the spreadsheet, so I know what we’re actually doing today. Professional podcast! Professional grade. I opened it two minutes ago, so I was so much better prepared. You’re right. But you also were here, like ten minutes late, so. Yeah, I’m sorry. For a time that you suggested. I’m not trying to burn you here, I’m just saying. Do we have an idea for the discussion nìNa’vi? No, but I’m sure that somebody will come up with one as we record. On it! (♫ Opening jingle ♫) Oel ayngati kameie, ma frapo, and welcome to the Eana Mokri podcast. Today we got some film news to talk about, some Tsu’tey’s Path comic discussion, a featured member interview … … and as always, some Na’vi practice conversation at the end. I’m Pamìrìk, and I can’t do that alone, so I have my wonderful co-hosts with me, Plumps… Kaltxì ma frapo! … Txawey… Kaltxì! … and Wllìm. Kaltxì. So, it was recently revealed via the official Twitter that Brendan Cowell has been cast for the Avatar sequels. Part of the live action sequence segments that are either beginning recording soon, or will be filming very shortly, they’re slated for spring of this year. Apparently he’s Mick Scoresby, a captain of a (quote) large-scale marine hunting vessel on Pandora. Other than looking up his IMDB, I have never heard of this guy, because I have not seen Game of Thrones. But apparently, he’s on that. Any reactions to this bit of news? Has anyone here watched Game of Thrones? Nope. Okay, well, I don’t have much to say. But I don’t remember him. He’s been in other things, but I don’t watch many movies or shows, so none of them ring a bell with me. I’m not very familiar with him. So, all I can say is that — actually not much. Accurate. I was gonna say, he looks kind of villainish, but there’s — we don’t know if he’s a villain or not, so… Yeah. According to some of the discussion that happened on LN he does apparently play villain roles quite well … … and if he’s part of a large-scale marine hunting vessel on Pandora, I can assume that’s somewhat hostile to the natural life. So it probably follows that he is RDA-adjacent. Yeah, but he could also be a captain of a huge hunting vessel because there’s still the people that are at Hell’s Gate. Also possible. Maybe they coordinated some fishing treaty of some kind, where the Na’vi and local people are comfortable with large-scale marine hunting vessels. I doubt it, but… It also seems, another discussion that has happened is that there’s a lot of potential parallels to a very prototypical environmentalist issue … … of, like, whale hunting, and like, overfishing, and, you know, the destruction that that can bring about. And it wouldn’t surprise me the least if that was an angle that Cameron wanted to go in. I don’t have any personal issue with that, before my words get misconstrued. But, just bringing out speculation. I see a lot of credibility to that, because, let’s remember that James Cameron is an accomplished diver … … and has done a lot in terms of ocean conservation work. So I can see that being a very big part of his angle with this character. Sure. Final note that I had on this subject was: sure seems they are bringing in a lot of Game of Thrones actors. It does. Before we moved on, though, there is another piece of news that we might wanna just briefly mention. Oh, what is that? The Pandora: World of Avatar is available on things other than Apple Music now. That is true, it was recently announced via Twitter and other social media outlets that the Valley of Mo’ara soundtrack … … the soundtrack to the Disney Animal Kingdom park, is now available on Spotify and, I quote, other platforms. Though, honestly, I don’t know of any others, and I haven’t checked. Google Play Music! Amazon? If you have other audio platforms, then check them, and you might be surprised to find yet another Avatar soundtrack on there. I know it’s on Google Play Music. I know that for sure. Does that also mean we will be getting a physical CD release? That would be nice. I’ll update in May. Every time somebody in LN goes to Pandora, we have to have them update us on the status of a physical soundtrack. I was just strolling their Twitter and I found out that they have a metal — one of the metal craft things of an AMP suit. So I know what I’m picking up when I go. Right, right, they have been expanding the product line offerings for Mo’ara merch. So — I’m not gonna have a lot of money when I come back. It’s way too easy to overspend in that shop. Well, I wouldn’t know, I haven’t been there, and neither has anyone else in this cast. True. Though, I’ve seen they have a lot of pretty cool stuff. Disney generally does a pretty good job with cool merch, so — I assume it’s like every merchandise shop ever. I mean, look at how much I spent in Cologne, with the Toruk show. A lot of times you’ll hear the tchotchke or like, novelty idea being thrown out with Disney shops. But Disney tends to be pretty good at making actually pretty darn high quality stuff. With the attention to detail to everything else in the park, it’s really no surprise. Exactly, like, it’s ridiculous. But I can go on for hours, so let’s not get into that. What about the other news? I was a little bit confused with the Vin Diesel stuff. What was that all about? Yeah, so that got misinterpreted. So Vin Diesel visited James Cameron’s set of Avatar. I believe it was the performance capture-like studio that they have. Apparently it was just a visit, to say hi, and like, you know, because Vin Diesel said he’s always wanted to work with Cameron. So he clearly, like, idolizes him, or looks up to him. But as far as we know there is no confirmation that he has an actual role in the film, in any capacity. And a Reddit account belonging to James Cameron, by all outwards appearances, it’s kind of hard to tell on the internet, but it definitely looks to be him … … actually commented on the post in the Avatar subreddit, saying no, he doesn’t have a part, this was a misunderstanding, sorry about that. No need to panic. Yeah, no need to panic, the Fast and the Furious universe is still a couple stones removed from the Avatar universe. Despite what some high-quality fan fiction may tell you. However there is no news yet on the Terminator. Right, I was actually told by — as soon as we heard anything about this, I told my one good friend, who’s a super huge Fast and the Furious fan. And he’s like, I’m suddenly interested in the Avatar sequels. And I was like, sure! Whatever — anything I can do to promote some Avatar goodwill among my friends, I will do so, happily. But when I revealed to him later, like, yeah, it looks like it was a misunderstanding. So like, well, we still got Sigourney Weaver and Stephen Lang. Yeah, yeah, definitely. Well, it doesn’t have to be The Fast and the Furious, Vin Diesel also plays the Riddick character, so at least that’s in space. Well, we don’t know where Fast and the Furious is going to go, so — Very fair point, there. All I know is that if I see Guardians of the Galaxy crossover, I’m quitting this fandom. You’re not the only one. I love both movies, but no, don’t. Yeah, I mean, well — if Vin Diesel was a canon addition to the sequels, then we would have, you know … … like half of the Guardians of the Galaxy, half of the crew of Game of Thrones. True! I always forget that he plays Groot. Yeah. I learned that because I looked it up on IMDB. Not because I’m particularly movie-savvy. He has five entire words, throughout both movies. Well, that ended up longer than anticipated. So let’s move on to Tsu’tey’s Path issue number 3. Who would like to start? Go, please start, because I know you have more positive words than I do. I haven’t heard — a lot of people have said this one is kind of devoid of info. And I’m gonna be honest, it’s definitely more devoid of info than the previous two have been. But there are a couple of scenes that I find very interesting. Specifically, I found the one in the beginning relatively interesting … … because this is the first time that we see Grace and Tsu’tey come back, and meet each other again. That was definitely one of the most substantial bits from this issue. I thought so to, to see that they have a deeper connection than is obvious from the movies. Or, from the movie. Will be movies soon. But not with Tsu’tey. Fair enough. I do remember, it was either in one of those early drafts, cause — I have read like every version of Avatar, from 880 to the final script. I can’t remember, but there was some — I vaguely remember some version of the script mention that Tsu’tey was also a particularly good student of Grace’s. Though, that might also just be me confusing the extensive Sylwanin lore with Tsu’tey. But we do know for a fact that Tsu’tey was one of Grace’s students. But it is nice to see that there was that connection. I didn’t know that. I just went from the knowledge that we have of the movie. There it seems, to me at least, that he wasn’t particularly involved with the school. So I was quite surprised by this. One other thing is — a lot of the comic goes through the hunting scene, that’s in one of the extended editions. I can’t remember if it’s the extended — only the ECE that has it, or if it’s both that and the extended theatrical that has it. I think it was in the special edition as well, but I’m not totally certain. I would be willing to bet that it was. I was looking to see if I could find it. I would venture to guess that there’s a significant amount of people that actually haven’t seen that scene. So I think that its inclusion in here was kind of purposeful in that sense. Because it’s a little bit of important backdrop for the party around the ylltxep for Tsu’tey’s visit to — it appears to be Tree of Souls, doesn’t it! Yeah, certainly, looks like it. Which — that scene was really interesting, because there’s like almost some kind of love interest there. With Sa’eyla, you mean? Yeah. Yeah. I mean, I said it before, in issue 1, where she talks about almost throwing over Eytukan. So, I mean, she seems like a handful. A troublemaker. One of the things I’m definitely gonna do once the full comic series has been revealed, is to actually go and reread. Because they juggle characters all the time. Like, Sa’eyla has definitely been a persistent presence in the comics so far. But like, in the first issue alone they threw out like four character names. And maybe two of them have seen more than one issue. It’s like, okay, who do I care about here. It will be interesting, once the full backstory is revealed to go through … … and then be like, okay, what did Sa’eyla do in every single issue. Sort of contextualize it like that. Yeah, I think the monthly serialization makes it somewhat hard to keep up with the storyline. Because, as you said, it’s pretty hard already to keep track of all the characters. And I already like, did a bit of rereading. But I think it will need, like, close inspection from my part to clearly see the story, when it’s all been released. So, going off of a point that Txawey made. So my critique is one that is shared by many people, that there wasn’t really a whole lot of substance in this issue. Basically, if you’ve seen the extended collector’s edition, and the deleted or unfinished scenes … … basically, if you’re a super huge Avatar nerd, most of this is — there’s no news here, really. But the interesting bit is that we can assume that the comics are canon. And the unfinished scenes always occupied a weird canonicity level, where it’s like, these were intended to be shot … … but then they weren’t, and was it just cut for time, or was it cut because it didn’t fit the vision after the fact. So now, with the sequels underway, every piece of Avatar media that is produced needs to adhere to a newfound value in canonicity. It’s interesting to see that they did in fact validate some of those deleted or unfinished or extended scenes as canon. And that we can presumably assume that everything that was there is canon. I mean, if they go and then decanonize the comic books later, I’ll be like, okay, what the hell are you guys doing? But as of this point, we can assume — Yeah, that a lot of that is canon. One of the more contentious canon scenes from the unfinished scene series was the scene called New Life … … where it is shown that Neytiri is pregnant with children. I mean, obviously now that we know that the sequels are gonna heavily revolve around the Sully family … … it’s like, duh, that’s basically canon. But I remember for a long time before we even knew that the Sully family would be the focus … … or maybe not the focus but definitely heavily involved in the sequels … … that was always something that’s like, this might have just been cut because we don’t know if Cameron actually wanted this to exist or not. But now we know. A lot of this is — they may have cut that for the sake of, we don’t want to set this up as though there’s a sequel coming … … without being a hundred percent sure that we’re gonna do sequels. Absolutely. Because Avatar — it’s easy to forget now, but Avatar was a huge unknown in its time. It’s definitely easy to forget considering it’s just kind of sitting there, on number one, still, nothing coming close to it. Close is relative. But yeah, no, I mean, for god’s sake, Twenty-First Century Fox kept Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel as a backup if Avatar flopped. Yikes. That is a piece of trivia that I will always hold on to. A backup. Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel, known in cinematic circles as a masterpiece. Of course. Not that I’ve ever seen it, but it’s on my bucket list to see it, I guess. My opinions: first one, decent. Others, they don’t exist. We don’t talk about them. Well, so you might want to cut this out, I don’t know. So, I mean, I have not seen the extended edition of the movie. So for me it was actually somewhat new. And I kind of liked it, it was interesting … … so maybe that’s from the perspective of someone who hasn’t seen the full version of the movie. I should, I guess. Absolutely. Yeah, and we’re keeping this in. That is actually a very good point, and Txawey mentioned that, that this issue may have largely been … … for the probably significant percentage of Avatar fans who have not seen the extended collector’s edition, or the special scenes, or any of that. Yeah, it’s definitely substantial stuff for people who haven’t seen those things. And again, because it’s now canon, obviously it’s now important for the larger, broader audience to know of these things. And again, all of my criticism stems from, I’ve already seen all of this, because I am in the top hundred of Avatar nerds. Yeah, I think that probably — I fall under that definition as well. I’m pretty sure anybody who can speak a lick of Na’vi falls under — The fact that we hold whole twenty-plus minute conversations at the end of every episode of the Avatar podcast … … slightly suggests to me that we might be in the target demographic of James Cameron’s Avatar. Wait wait wait wait wait. You mean, we are not talking about The Last Airbender? No, that’s the other podcast. Two doors down. Do they have a podcast, even? Probably. It’s a really big fanbase. Maybe we should do a crossover at some point. Not that I’ve ever seen it, but we can trashtalk about it. It’s about the movie right? We missed a killer April First opportunity. Next year. We had to get the nävis one out first. Right. Okay, so yeah, between now and next year, we need to build many bridges with the Avatar: The Last Airbender community … … find their podcast, and then, like, swap audiences — swap hosts for like a day. That would be awesome. Two groups of hosts that have no idea what they’re talking about. Yes, I’ve personally never even seen anything of Avatar: The Last Airbender. So I would be the most clueless. I know — I’m equally clueless. No idea. I’m the only one who’s seen it? I know you’re not alone in this community, I know there’s a bunch of other people who talk about it. I can tell you, it’s worth it. Oh, I know. There’s lots of media that I haven’t seen. I’m not a thing-watcher. Thing-watcher. That’s my problem. I don’t watch things. So, sort of indicative of my role on this podcast: the way that I approach media is like … … I will find a piece of media that I like a lot, and then do an extremely deep dive on it. I find it very hard for me to do a very broad — watch a lot of things and not get like super invested in them and do like full wiki-walks on them. So me getting involved in a piece of media is a very exhaustive thing, like it drains a lot of energy for me to get involved in something new. So I haven’t seen a whole lot of things, but I know everything there is to know about the things I involve myself in. Right, yeah, for Avatar that is pretty clear, I would say. It would appear so. Somewhat. That blue name over there seems to vaguely suggest that. Speaking of huge Avatar nerds, so, we have a featured member interview finally returning to the podcast. I know it’s been a while since we’ve done one of these. But trust us, audience, we have not forgotten. We just — okay, honesty moment. During the recording of the last two episodes, we were like, holy moly, this has gone on really long. We can’t make this episode go on any longer, let’s push it to next episode. And then that happened twice. So, anyway, because this is a slightly lighter episode as far as conversation topics go, we’re gonna resume our interviews … … and hopefully continue along down through the hosts, and then get to interviewing other members of the community, which will be very exciting. We will have other guests on the podcast. Looking forward to it. Me too. So, ma Wllìm, it’s your turn. Kaltxì! So, as we always do, talk a little bit about yourself. Maybe a little bit about your background, and how you got to the community. Okay, so my name is Wllìm, as you hopefully already know if you’ve listened to this podcast for a few times. I live in the Netherlands. So, as for my background, I am a PhD student in computer science in real life … … and then at some point I got involved with Avatar. So, I think in 2011, I saw Avatar for the first time. This was on DVD, I have never seen Avatar actually in a cinema. And then I didn’t really know yet that the language was learnable … … but I already liked the language, but I thought it was just gibberish. Then at some point, I think during a random Wikipedia walk I figured out that it was actually a language, that you could learn. And I started learning, and this was the end of 2013. And then, after a few months, I made an account on the forum. And well, that’s it, basically, I guess. And did you have any background in language learning, apart from English? Okay, so I got French and German, was taught in high school, but I didn’t really pick up on that a lot back then. I had already been interested in constructed languages earlier. So I’ve had a brief period of learning Lojban, which is a constructed logical language. Yeah, I’m just interested in languages in general. I remember, I think, at one point, when we had a conversation nìNa’vi that you told me about the Lojban connection. Yeah, that is really an interesting language. So if there’s any conlangers around here who have not tried to learn it yet, or at least learned about the grammar rules yet, look at it. Because this makes everything so logical. Which I like. Computer scientist. I’ve definitely seen it among the list of the poster children for conlanging. It’s like Klingon, Elvish, and then like Lojban usually rounds up the list at the bottom. But I know nothing about it. But the fact that you mention that it’s a very logical one has picked my curiosity. I’ll at least Wikipedia-article it. So I basically forgot all vocabulary, so I really cannot speak any Lojban anymore. But I still know, kind of like the grammar. And it’s just so logical. Like, I mean, we all know that Na’vi is already a pretty logical language. But if you’ve ever done — studied any Lojban, then Na’vi has so many exceptions. It’s too natural. Interesting. Then I might actually like it. Maybe. I was struggling to find another language that I would like, so… If you want to pick it up again, I would be also interested in doing this together with you, because I would want to pick it up at some point again. We’ll see. I see a new podcast… Welcome to the Lojban podcast. Literally just us. They definitely have a Discord, so maybe they have a podcast. I don’t know. Anyway. You joined the Learn Na’vi community. Is there anything in particular that drove you to the community? Is it just that you wanted to learn it, or was there something else that you found interesting? So, for me, when I watched Avatar for the first time, I was of course blown away by the movie itself. But I think, just to be honest, I think not as much as most other people that would be listening right now. I — I mostly got here because I really like the sound of the language, and I wanted to learn it. So I mean, when I figured out that Na’vi was learnable, then of course immediately the first, I think, external link on the Wikipedia page was … … okay, there’s this one forum where people actually make an effort to learn the language. So I really came for that reason, in the first place. And of course in the meantime, I’ve also become more and more an actual Avatar fan. But I really came for the language in the first place. All right. We touched about that in last episode, because by now, you’re the only one very active from the Netherlands by now. I remember that there was a member called Puvomun and he contributed quite a lot in the beginning. Have you done anything for — project-wise, for the language or for the community? So, okay, I’m a computer scientist, basically. And I really like doing things with — in the intersection of Na’vi and programming and stuff. So I think a few years ago I made a program that conjugates Na’vi verbs, puts infixes in there, and one for nouns, and I put that online. And I think some people like it. And right now I’m working, off and on, on a much larger project … … which is basically to make an online dictionary that has all the available information about words. This is, like, something which is still in its infancy. And I will announce it when it’s ready, which is probably in a few years I guess. Hopefully earlier. I’m trying to — I know the feeling. Your site, that depicts the nouns and the verbs, it is quite helpful. Maybe we can put a link in wherever this is going to go. Okay. To your site. All right. If the others don’t have questions about the larger background, then we could go into the more Na’vi-related stuff. So, I think what we all want to know by now is: do you have a favorite word? I like many Na’vi words. I think my favorite word would be aungia, like, a sign from Eywa, spiritual sign. Just because it sounds so nice. I in general like, by sound, words with many vowels in there: meoauniaea, ‘eoio, and so on. All right. That’s just a sound-based thing. I mean — It’s a good reason, though. I like Na’vi because it sounds so nice, so I thought it made sense to have a favorite sound-based word. I never use it though, because when do you want to talk about spiritual signs? Not often. True. Unless you live a really enchanted life. But it makes it all the more special. And what about a least favorite word? Vonvä’. I’m sorry. You’re quite outspoken for your dislike for that word. I really don’t like it. I never understood. Is it because of the sound, or is it because of the meaning? No, this is because of the meaning. So, it’s always been a principle that Na’vi doesn’t really have vulgar words. I mean, you have wiya, you have tsahey, you have oìsssss… You have a few of those words which are somewhat offensive, but not really. And then suddenly, we got vonvä’, which to me just sounds like someone needed a translation for, I don’t know, asshole or something. And this word was created. And I think it just doesn’t fit into the culture. Like, of course, I understand, Na’vi are, like, people, so they will probably shout at each other and be angry with each other … … but it seems like vonvä is a particularly bad word. And I don’t like it, and I would prefer if it would be removed from the language. But I guess that’s impossible, so hey. All right. Well, I understand where you’re coming from. I mean, just because a word exists in a language doesn’t mean that you have to use it, so I know, you won’t use it. Yeah, just like I voluntarily choose to not use kxì. I have no problems with kxì. Although I would have liked txì more, I think. So, on the topic of vonvä’, I think it’s the best compromise. So it’s actually very similar to my feelings about kxì. Though I’m okay with vonvä’, but, like, you have to be very deliberate about using it. It’s not something that you can just throw out there, like some people use some expletives. But I think the fact that it’s tied to its etymology literally just being stink-soul, sounds like — it seems like a very Na’vi way of insulting somebody. Where it’s not, I don’t know, meaninglessly expletive like words like fuck are in English. But it does have a very clear meaning, that does come across in what its intent is to be … … is that somebody is particularly reprehensible would be a stink-soul. I forgot that that was the etymology of that. Yeah, vitra aonvä’. So, for that reason I excuse it, though I do agree somewhat with Wllìm’s assessment that Na’vi tends to be classier … … though that might just be because of the vocabulary that Frommer has given us this far. Who knows, in you know four years from now, after the sequels have run their course … … and all of the language has been created for the necessity of the films that are planned, anyway … … we might have, you know, a whole twenty new curse words to know. And, you know, it’s not really our position to say — I guess, be upset because what’s in the language, I say as I vehemently hate lumpe and kxì. Yeah, of course — Again, exactly what Plumps said, though, you can just not use it. I mean, there’s words about English I don’t like, there’s words in Dutch I don’t like, so this is not, like, an insult to Karyu Pawl, or whatever. I mean, of course there’s words that people like and don’t like. And I don’t like vonvä’. You can like it. I mean, I don’t care. Just personally, I don’t like it. If it brings you any comfort, it’s not even in my top 200. In your top 200? You have a top 200 list? No, but I can spitball it, and I know for sure that it is not up there in my favorite words. Why didn’t we come to that when we interviewed you? That would have been a one hour long interview. Word 1. Word 2. Word number 57: loi. I think about the words, that it’s probably driven by the script. So if we think about the one story that Karyu Pawl always tells, is that he had to come up with the word for behind or butt pretty much on the spot … … because there was a scene where they wanted to include that. If it weren’t for that, we wouldn’t have a word for this body part. We have so many of these oddly specific words, right? Yeah, that’s true, yeah. I also, I agree with Pamìrìk here, that I think we will see more swear words. Or maybe more räptum language, right, so yeah. I don’t wanna talk too long, cause I know we’re trying to interview Wllìm here. But that was something that I did find interesting, was that we had this idea of räptum rä’ä, before we had a whole lot of things to be räptum to begin with. That’s true — Yeah, but you can be really räptum without using actual swearwords, right? If I say in English, you’re stupid, then I mean, I’m not using offensive words, but it’s still offensive. In Na’vi you can probably come up with the most idiotic and severe offensive language, without actually using offensive words. And that’s actually one of the things I liked about this. I mean, saying things to a distinguished person without using honorific pronouns or infixes would probably be considered räptum. So, how long have you been learning the Na’vi language? I know that you mentioned that you joined shortly after you learned that it was a learnable language. But have you ever taken any breaks in your learning? Or have you been pretty consistent the entire time? So — I — okay. I’m pretty consistent with not being very active at learning. Like, I’m not the type of person — I feel it. I’m not the type of person who learns every day. For me this goes in, like, sprints. Like on Saturday I hear this podcast or I read this text, and I think I should become better at this. So I start drilling. And then I drill for maybe three hours. And at some point I’m less motivated, and then next week I’m like, okay, I should do this. And, okay, I cannot recommend this strategy to anyone, because I think it’s highly suboptimal, but I think it’s how my personality works. Also, I just don’t have so much time to spend on Na’vi, so this is naturally how this goes. So on and off, since 2013. With more or less activity. Got it, that’s fine. In particular, I am really behind on new words right now. So I know many of the original words, but some of the newer words that Karyu Pawl put on Na’viteri, I just don’t know. And I really need to get better at this, so probably after this podcast is recorded, I’ll go on a sprint and do three hours of new words learning there. Cram style. If you could ask James Cameron or Karyu Pawl a related question, language- or movie-wise, what would it be? Yeah, so that would definitely be language-wise for me. I would ask if Karyu Pawl could give me, like, a long example of Na’vi as it would be spoken a few thousand years ago. Because I like etymology, and I would really want to see how the Na’vi language evolves. And I think seeing a prototype of the language of long time ago, would give a much better understanding of how Na’vi actually works. Even nowadays. I’m aware that this is actually not one question, because, like everyone on this podcast … … we are actually asking something which takes days or weeks or months to prepare. But that would be my question. I think that’s really cool, though. Just even if it wasn’t an example of like, spoken Na’vi of thousands and thousands of years ago … … but more just like: oh, here’s a rundown of how the language has changed. Like what are the key differences between ancient Na’vi and present Na’vi. Yes. I would be really interested in that too, because I know we know a small amount about really in general what it was about ten thousand years ago … … but we don’t have anything specific as to what’s fallen out of use versus what’s more come into use, that was considered very informal back then. Yes. So this is also not only about vocabulary, this is also about grammar points. Because, for example, Na’vi has tripartiteness, right? So you have a different case ending for agent, patient and subject for intransitive verbs. How did that come to be? Almost no — on earth almost no natural languages have that. And Na’vi is linguistically speaking a bit of a weird compromise … … because with modal verbs you don’t get the -l ending, the agenitive ending… How did this come to be? Was this different, a thousand years ago, was this the same, has it always been like this … … how did someone even come up with those case endings in the first place? Because I’m interested in linguistics — I read Wikipedia about history of English and history of Dutch, and how did they converge — diverge. That kind of stuff. So I would really like to see this for Na’vi. I think that’s an excellent question. Yeah, very interesting. Let’s ask him. Pawm ko. Right, any other questions from the other hosts? What does the Learn Na’vi community mean to you? Ah, so, okay, this is a hard question, because I’m not generally the person to express emotions very well. So for me, okay. It’s firstly, very plainly speaking, it’s a place that I spend lots of time on … … and that, I mean, sometimes helps keeping me sane when I have to do deadlines for work et cetera. Because it’s just in general a very friendly place, it’s one of the friendliest places on the internet I know. People are always willing to help. So I mean, if I have a day when I’m really not feeling well, like, I’m in a bad mood, I interact with Learn Na’vi a bit, and this gets much better. And I mean in general, I have been here since 2014, so it’s just like, almost my five year anniversary right now … … maybe it’s actually my five year anniversary somewhere around now, because I wrote down, April 2014. So it’s just a large part of my life. So it means a lot to me. I find it a bit hard to express it more clearly than this. No, I definitely understand where you’re getting from — where you’re coming from, what you’re saying with those words … … I know this community can definitely feel like a second home for me too, so we’re definitely quite close … … for an internet community that is as large as we are. You don’t see that very often, right? Not at all. Many communities becoming hostile, and — I am of course on many websites and stuff, and this is definitely this friendliest one that I know, the closest one. Right. Definitely a lot of newcomers will also say something very similar, along those lines. That we are an incredibly welcoming group, and that they really appreciate that. And I think that ties hand in hand with just the greater ethos of, you know, Avatar and the Na’vi species as a whole. Yeah. And it’s not something that you tend to find in a lot of fandoms. A lot of fandoms tend to be very, very exclusive, and be a little bit more hostile to newcomers, especially if it’s a fandom that’s been around for a while. That’s something I try to be very mindful of. As I definitely always want to be encouraging people to learn and grow and practice and get better. Everyone is a learner. We should keep that in mind. There’s no native speakers. Yeah, there’s literally no native speakers, and oftentimes answers of questions are not known, and then no one knows, literally. So everyone is a learner, and that is not just a figure of speech, that is actually what it is like. Some of my favorite memories of interacting with people on LN is having these massive discussions … … about trying to say something in Na’vi that we just can’t figure out how to say. Yes. I got my fair share of those. In particular, anything with programming is particularly hard. Anything else you want to say, just to the audience, Wllìm, just in general. You got a soapbox, you can say whatever you want from the top of it. Irayo ma frapo, you are all great. That’s it, that was my soapbox talk. I really prepared that very well. Very inspiring. Good night. Drops mic. With that out of the way, we’re gonna move on to our final segment, our Na’vi language practice. We have a word of the cast, as always, to begin the discussion. Word of the cast today is sìlpey, the verb “to hope”. And on that subject, I will ask the prompting question: Zusawkrrìri, sìlpey ayngal peut? Tìpawm angäzìk. Fpìl ko. Tam. Sìlpey oe tsnì slu oe tìftiatu kifkeyä. Sko ngeyä txintìn, kefyak? Ma Txawey, srake ngal tok fìtsengit? Sran. Sngum rä’ä si. Sìlpey oe. Ha, tìftiari kifkeyä new ngal txintìnti? Sran, ulte new oe kivar nìtxan. Ah, tslolam. Oeri nìteng nìngay, slä teyngta peuteri new oe kivar ke omum oel. Nga tsun kivar lì’fyati leNa’vi, kefyak? Ulte nga li tsakem si. Ha, flolä. Ulte nìsìlpey sko txintìn ngeyä. Srane, fpolìl oel nìtxan futa tsun oe sngivä’i tsyänelti YouTube-ä teri fìlì’fya. Ulte — Mll’an. Srake nga sngeykolä’i tsat li, kefyak? Srane, sngolä’i, slä fìzìsìt kekem soli. Slä — Kea relti arusikx oel ngolop, fìzìsìt. Slä fkoru keu, fpìl oel. Taluna tsyänel fkeytok, ulte ketsrana krr nga new kemo sivi, tsakem si nga. Ulte fpìl oel futa suteru a sayunu tsa’u. Nìngay lu oeru mipa aysä’o a ngivop relti arusikx. Ha nängew oe ngivop ‘awvea *episode-ti nìmun. Fte tsan’ivul. Sran, sran. Ha awnga sìlpey ko. New oe ngivop ayrelit arusikx nìteng, slä ke lu oeru kea krr. Slä lamu oeru säfpìl a ngop ‘awa relit arusikx a sla’tsu ayhorenit lì’fyayä leNa’vi nìpup. Slä lu oeru säfpìl, slä ke lu oeru kea krr, tafral tsakem ke soli. Tìngäzìk lekrrkrr — letrr. Smon oeru tsatì’efu. Ha sìlpey oe tsnì lìyevu oeru krr nì’ul. Tsaw lu ngäzìk. Oeri, oe ‘in nìtxan nìteng. Lu oeru — lu oeru hawng tìkangkemviyä. Smon oer tsatì’efu nìteng. Frakrr new oe pxaya kem sivi, ulte tsakrr ke lu oeru kea krr a nìltsan ‘awa kem sivi. Ulte, ulte, ke sunu oeru tsaw. Slä ke tsun fko leykivatem. Pewn torukä. Sìltsana lì’fyavi. Srane, srane. Zolene oe fpivìl. Poltxe oe san zene fko leykivatem sìk a krr … … fpolìl oel futa fkeytok tsalì’fyavi leNa’vi a fko tsun sivar fìtsenge. Ulte tsakrr zolerok oel. Ftolia oel nìfkrr lì’u alu li. Li? Srane, nìsìlpey tsivun oe sivar tsalì’ut fìpotkästìmì. Pelun tsalì’u ke lu lì’u fìtrrä? Ha ke tsun oe sivar tsalì’ut, kefyak? Mehintrray, lì’u alu li layu lì’u hapxìyä. Kehe! Kehe. Li pole’un ayoel lì’ut fìpotkästä. Txantsan. Sola. Ha, oeri sìlpey oe tsnì awngeyä kifkey ke lìyevu na pum a mì Uniltìrantokx. Ha sìlpey oe tsnì awngal ke skìyeva’a awngeyä kifkeyti. Srane. Oe kelku seri fìkifkeymì. Sunu oeru fìkifkey. Fìkifkeyti tok oel. Ha rä’ä skiva’a, rutxe. Srane, srane. Pxaya tute plltxe san zusawkrrmì livu, slä krro krro fpìl oel futa tìska’al fìtsengit tok li. Srane. Nìfrakrr, slä zene fko spivaw futa lu ayoeru tsu’o a ngivop nìmun. Ulte tsun ngivop ayut asìltsan, ulte nìfrakrr tsun ayoe tsan’ivul. Srane, nìsìlpey. Lu ayoeru tsatsu’o. Slä ke lu oeru txana tsìlpey a aySawtute tsakem sayi. Taluna natkenong vospxìam aysutel oeyä atxkxeyä ftxoley mipa ayeyktanit, ulte tsakrr eyktan a yolora’ plltxe nìyey san aysute ke tsun skiva’a kifkeyt. Tsaw ke fkeytok — ke tsunslu. Ha ke zene ayoe leykivatem kaw’it sìk. Ulte tsaw lu fe’. Tsaw lu fe’ nì’aw. Ulte aysutel oeyä atxkxeyä nìyey ftxoley tsaeyktanit. Pol yolora’. Ma Wllìm, tok oel Yueseyti. Ha mi tslivam oel tsatìngäzìkti. Slä mi lu oeru tsìlpey. Taluna tsayfo ke lu txampxì. Ulte lu txampxìr fratìtxur. Ììì, rutxe liveyn? Kehe. Ke tsun oe liveyn tsat taluna fe’a *nävis. Nga poltxe *nävis? Kehe. Ke tsun — *nävis fìtsenge lu kxanì. Srane, fìtrr ke lu ‘awvea trr fìvospxìyä. Srane. Slä spaw oel futa — fu teyngta paylì’ut nga plltxe. Tse, nìngay lu ayolo’ur tsu’o a leykivatem fra’ut. Srane, netrìp. Eyktanìl — kolan, ayeyktan eyk nì’aw. Nong — zene ayoel nong ayeyktanti fte tsayforu livu tìtxur …? Ke lu kea sweya lì’u. Luke ayoe ayeyktan ke tsun ‘iveyk. Srane, fo fkeytok frakrr. Ha, zene livu awngaru tsìlpey. Srane. Srane. Hasey, srak? Fì’u lu vur a ke lu ‘o’ ulte set nga new hasey sivi srak? Srane. Fìtìpängkxo ke lu ‘o’. Kop lu lehawngkrr fìtseng, ulte zene oe tìkangkem sivi trray. Fu fìtrr. Fìtrr, srane. Oeri, oe nìteng. Tam, tsakrr hasey sìsyi oe. Hasey si ko. All right, with that we’re gonna wrap up the podcast. Be sure to join us next time for discussion all things Avatar. We literally don’t have any topics lined up, so it’s a mystery to current me what future me will be talking about. But if you stay subscribed to the Eana Mokri podcast, you’ll know as soon as I do. I bet Na’vi will be involved at some point. Definitely, without a doubt, there will be Na’vi. I’m pretty sure that Pamìrìk will say oel ngati kameie in the beginning. I might, but I might change it up. Oh, oh, adventurous. Yeah, cliffhanger. I might say, oel ayngati kamänge (!) Oh, stay tuned! You might say, kameie oel ngati. Oh! What are those exotic Na’vis that we are speaking. Man, I think we’re giving away too many spoilers for next episode. We’re gonna end it right now. (♫ Closing jingle ♫)

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