Business ideas you never got started with | SwiftCase Productivity Podcast #11

Business ideas you never got started with | SwiftCase Productivity Podcast #11


Hi everyone and welcome to the SwiftCase Productivity podcast, my name’s Adam Sykes, founder of SwiftCase, the
professional productivity platform. CRAIG: And I’m Craig McCarthy, development manager of
SwiftCase and I work at our Baltic Triangle office in Liverpool. PHIL: I’m Phil and
I also work with Craig at the Baltic Triangle and I’m a developer there. ADAM: Okay,
great so today we’re going to talk about something we were talking about the
other day, wasn’t it Craig and about the idea that people have ideas but they
don’t actually follow through with them. So I think I was saying, I’ve, over the
years I’ve thought of quite a few different businesses where if only I’d
have done them I’d be a you know, billionaire by now, yeah and so I think there was one
back when I worked in a computer shop, when I was in back in school actually, I had
a part-time Saturday job and one lunch time I was speaking with the manager
there and we were talking about MP3s, they were like the latest things
everyone was getting, these sound files off the internet and it was
a much smaller file so in the past when you needed a CD and you had to
copy it to another CD if you were, you know, wanted to like make a backup with
your songs or whatever but now you could like put it all onto an MP3 and
put your MP3s onto this thing- it was a minidisc, it was
a short-lived product, before we have obviously we had like
MP3 players and so on and we would talk about how these files are so
small that you could just download them over the internet why can’t we stream
them over the Internet and it’s like, well if you can stream them over the
Internet, well why are you paying for them like to keep them why don’t you
just pay to stream and like, why didn’t, you know this could be in a like a pub
where you could have a jukebox and like effectively people could pick any song
in the in the world and you could just stream it and like we didn’t really get
to the full concept because at the time smartphones weren’t a thing, so we didn’t
really get to the the idea that people would be able to stream them to their person,
it was sort of the idea you could stream to a computer, we came up with the
idea of that it would be like a jukebox in the pub, but effectively
we created Spotify, you know we’d invented Spotify in a
lifetime and then we actually talked about doing something
but like lots of people we’ve- that was as far as it went. – PHIL: So why
do you think that you never followed it up? – I think there’s barriers isn’t there, you think that “Oh, I’d need this money to do it, I’d need this, I’d need this expertise to
do it or there’s something that’s holding me back, that you ultimately
put yourself off, that you blew yourself off the idea or you just got lazy and you just don’t think about again, it’s like a chat in a pub,
people have had chats in the pub, like they’ve invented
things – CRAIG: I mean I’ve invented the sausage machine – Yeah, I mean I’m not sure that’s been taken
up as a as a multi-million dollar business there. CRAIG: Well there’s that hot dog machine that’s out there – PHIL: Yeah, the George Foreman Lean Mean Fat Reducing Grilling Machine™ or whatever it is. – I had it before him. PHIL: What was special about your invention was that, I do seem to remember that it was quite special. It was a machine, right, I mean we all hate getting up in the morning – PHIL: I have no choice. – ADAM: Any venture capitalist listening to this, this is the pitch
for the sausage- CRAIG: You know, putting sausages into the grill and frying them, you know how
amazing would be if you had a dedicated sausage machine, one that you could
literally just pop the sausages in, like a toaster- PHIL: or a microwave. – Yeah, just put it down like that
and then just get on with your business, it catches all the fats underneath that
you can easily dispose of – PHIL: Or you could, could re purpose for more profit. – Yeah, exactly, but yeah it was already invented, I think it
was already invented because I told everyone at the pub about this for many
years. ADAM: Yeah, it’s been five four or five years Craig’s been talking about this machine and
then we actually did look it up and someone did have a version of the
sausage, The Sausager™ was going to be the trademarked brand, so, but I mean it like there’s
loads of ideas, I mean following on from what I said about the MP3s, the next
thing as we moved on there was something we talked about, you know is how
technology improved, we to videos being much smaller and then in a similar
vein- they’re not YouTube I meant in Netflix,
so it’s the idea that you could have a machine
because the sky box actually had a hard drive in and you know it was
effectively like a computer, if you plug the internet into the the box, because people were
used to having boxes for their TV, why couldn’t we just screen films to the thing, just cash it and display it on the TV and charge
people a subscription because at the time it was when I had, I don’t know if
anyone remembers, I had this it was like love film – Yep. – PHIL: Well didn’t Netflix come out with love film? – Yeah, it did, but
they came up with the idea I came up with but I didn’t do anything, yeah they had the infrastructure and they had all the films
and the gateway to them starting probably was
easier but at the same time I didn’t do anything other than have an idea so it’s,
I suppose it’s, people who have these business ideas actually need to go
out and do something, it’s the doing that is the important bit. – CRAIG: Having the idea, and telling everyone
at the pub about it isn’t gonna get it done. -No. – and you know, you could actually make millions on these ideas, it’s about actually getting out there and doing it isn’t it. PHIL: So what the
obstacles that you need to get over then to sort of do it then? I think the obstacles, the biggest obstacle is
yourself, if you want if you come up with an idea, you need to just do it
don’t you, you know like we’re talking about Nike. You need to buy a pair of Nikes first.ADAM: Yeah, get a t-shirt that says just do it. You need to buy the full kit and then you’re good. – Yeah, buy all the
equipment, I suppose that actually is another thing that people think they
need equipment, that’s a barrier isn’t it, all the gear no idea, I mean we, I suppose this podcast,
people can leave their comments below about what they think about our podcast
but we’re on like episode, don’t know what we’re on now? 12? 10, 12? I don’t know, we don’t really keep track do we? When we release them we put
that the episode numbers on but what what have we bought really, I mean we
bought that microphone. Everything else we’re using is like
cameras that you’ve got from you doing photography, you got an interest in
photography and we’ve done stuff with an iPhone, a Samsung – PHIL: WE could have just done it with an iPhone – we could have just done it with an iPhone, it’s only that we had those
and now we’ve got some lights because you know we had some lights lying
around from your, again from your photography but you know you didn’t need,
you don’t need those like you couldn’t if you can like get the light in that you
got to do the job that you need to do, then you know, we don’t need that, you can
have whatever type of microphone you want, if there was only one of you you
probably wouldn’t need a microphone that was like that one, that one’s quite
good at picking us up, but you know the barrier
to entry is actually just your phone. PHIL: Well you exactly Steven Soderbergh is a
Hollywood director who’s now, makes films outside of the Hollywood system more or less,
his last couple of films have been shot on iPhones exclusively and in
fact these he shot a film about the outbreak of a virus, I forget
what it’s called now, on the same cameras we’re using here which are consumer
DSLR’s and he his advice whenever he gets in is literally
go and shoot it on the phone you’ve got because it’s literally, except without the lens
attachments, it’s a higher definition than what people have been shooting films on for like
two decades, yeah you know, so there really isn’t any excuses is there,
except for whatever your assumptions are about what is required because other
people have it and we have we talked about that one in another
podcast about business; I’m just doing what I think I should be doing and
what everyone else appears to be doing and unless I copy them- it’s a form of cargo cultism. Have you heard the story about the cargo cult, why
it’s called car cultism? ADAM: Yeah, yeah do you want to tell-? It’s one of my favourite stories,
I think it’s an island south of Japan that was in between airports
that supplies would be going, between the Second World War, and every now and then
this island which has had indigenous people on it hadn’t left the island and
their technology very, very primitive when they saw the planes, they sort of
were unsure what they were and they tried to sort of incorporate into their mythology
and sometimes cargo would fall out the plane
and somebody would get it and betrayed it and they would appear to be a rich
man and the way that the mythology worked in those tribes, people
gain dominance through trading if they had lots of objects, they were their
master and they were their chief so when they then experienced anyone
from Japan or a nearby country came in with all these amazing guns, they were
suddenly dominated and they felt completely undermined so they thought to
themselves, well the only way we can get all these goods that these people have
got, is from the airplanes, we need to build an airport, so they built out
of bamboo, fleet airports with towers like bamboo binoculars
and bamboo calling towers and things like that and then just sat there
waiting for the planes to land. No planes landed because they were
starting this principle that if they just did what other people had,
then success will arrive and I think of those behaviours and those
expectations are what stop people from- ADAM: Yeah, I can’t make a good video if I haven’t got the best camera –
you know, actually, Hollywood directors are doing doing it and have been for years. ADAM: Yeah and that’s the same with
anything isn’t it I mean I suppose there’s that old saying about how a bad workman blames their tools, you know, it’s not the tools that do the good
job, it’s the worker behind it isn’t? A bad businessman blames his
opportunities on something – ADAM: blames their staff. *laughing* You’ve got to accept responsibility, I
suppose that’s a key thing is you’ve got accept responsibility
that, you know, if you want to get something done, you need to do it, the gear, the equipment is not, no that’s not it. CRAIG: I think you’ve
told me a good story before actually, about one of your friends, who bought a
guitar. PHIL: Oh yeah, yeah he’ll end up watching us There’s a guy who, it’s cargo cultism
exactly, actually, when we were all learning guitar as teenagers – ADAM: Bought the guitar a particular band used. – It’s not just that, I think we all, everyone
does now CRAIG: I did that. PHIL: Well I think it’s the idea that if you
then buy the most expensive guitar available, – ADAM: You’ll be better. –
I will then therefore get up to speed with you guys and be part of that
thing but all it ends up doing is cause you need to be ostracized because people
are like, “You haven’t learnt the ropes, you haven’t sort of done the circuit,” or whatever and so and it just, and in fact buying
the most expensive gear exposes, it doesn’t- ADAM: It almost put you in expectation, doesn’t it, if someone turns up with a like expensive guitar and- If someone turns up looking like Slash – ADAM: Playing the Beatles – and they’re just not up to scratch – PHIL: But then there’s Gibson Les Paul
and they’re playing the Yellow Submarine but, so much of business, sort of
business 101 is fake it till you make it, and I’m not really sure
really sure how to go to foster sorry business but obviously it must have worked
on some level. ADAM: Well I suppose the other way of saying that is a different way of
saying it, because that sounds quite negative is, practice makes perfect or certainly you make progress as you practice, because if you don’t do something, you can’t get better, you know, if you never try
you’re never gonna you’re never gonna succeed are you? You
might might fail but if you never start something you know you’ll finish. – PHIL: You
miss one percent of the shots you don’t take. –
Exactly. You know, all these phrases, people know these phrases, and you don’t do
it, like if you don’t know how to do something, you just need to learn it,
it’s not a barrier, is it, you’ just need to go out and learn it – PHIL: Literally, yeah. –
That’s, you know, try things and if they don’t work out, try something else. PHIL: Do you think
people don’t do it because it’s such a public forum to just engage in business,
it’s not like learning guitar, I could learn guitar and go in my room and play
privately on this quite acoustic guitar and no one can hear my mistakes. – ADAM: It’s fear, isn’t it. – Yeah, it’s like if I go out into a business,
I’m literally putting myself out there instantly. CRAIG: I suppose people just don’t know
where to start either, like how do I get this up off the ground? ADAM: But if you really wanted
to start something, couldn’t you go and find out? I think that’s one of
the poor excuses isn’t it, it’s very similar to that “I haven’t got the
equipment” – PHIL: or the time. – I haven’t got the skills, I haven’t got the time or I
haven’t, I don’t know where to start, it’s like if
you want to do something, find out how to to do it, find out how to start a business, find out how to do a particular thing that you need to do for your business or pay
someone else to do it, that’s the other option, you know,
you can hire in skills and if your idea is a great idea and you can afford to
invest in it or you can convince someone that your idea’s good enough that they’ll
invest in you then you can afford to pay for someone. CRAIG: I think that’s kind of the problem with capital, usually when it comes to
starting these things but as you said, I think, if you’ve got a good enough idea – ADAM: Yeah, I mean some businesses obviously will have an an entry cost but
it’s whether, I suppose, if you believe in it, can you make someone else believe in
your idea enough to – PHIL: Dragons Den. – Yeah, you know, Dragons Den, or banks, banks do give out money
to some businesses, you might only need a small amount you
know and, I don’t wanna encourage people to get into personal
debt but you know if something’s a small cost, like say five hundred pounds might
be a small cost and you can get you know some kind of credit or you know family
and friends can help you out and you can, you believe in the idea and you
think it’s going to take you places, is it worth the
risk? PHIL: Especially because you might you know take a risk and buy a piece of technology that’s more expensive or a car, people have readily or enthusiastically thrown the
money away on purchases which could easily be used for personal or business – ADAM:
How much you spend on coffees, you know, in a year, could
you have just put that into a business? If you want, I mean not everyone
could, you know, this a generalization but most people could probably save some
money somewhere if they really believed in something or you know get your
first client on board and get a 50% deposit and then buy your equipment then or there’s lots of ways you can do it so
like I said, money shouldn’t be an obstacle, equipment shouldn’t be an
obstacle, skills shouldn’t be an obstacle, from my point of view, there’s no excuse not to get started – PHIL: The obstacle is the mindset and if
you just need to, just do it. Just go out and do it. PHIL: DO IT NOW! Unless someone’s done it before, do Spotify now. ADAM:
In that case, just better, do it better than everyone else, do
it differently, or I suppose, do it differently is a big thing
for Apple but do it the same because it you know it works – PHIL: Do it the same
but destroy the competition on the sly. Okay so as you can see my philosophy
is just get things done, and hopefully you’ve enjoyed our podcast
today and please leave any comments below about how you’ve started your
business or whether you’re thinking about starting a business, if you’ve
got any ideas or if you want any, if you’ve got any questions, maybe we
can help you get started or any other comments you want to leave, leave
them down below, you can also ask us some questions on our social media channels, we’re on Twitter @SwiftCaseUK, you can catch us all at LinkedIn Craig
McCarthy, Adam Sykes and Phil Whitby and check out our website for more
information about some of the things we do and some of the ways we can help, swiftcase.co.uk Thanks for listening, my name is Adam Sykes, this has
been the SwiftCase productivity podcast, hope to see you next time. PHIL: See you next time. *awkward laughing*

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