British Accent Practice: Test Your English Listening Skills – Learn English Podcast 196

British Accent Practice: Test Your English Listening Skills – Learn English Podcast 196


Hi there you are listening to Adept English
and this is a listen and learn podcast. My name is Hillary and I created this listen
and learn method to help you speak English fluently. It’s much more enjoyable if you
learn English in the way that your brain naturally wants to learn. I live in the United Kingdom.
I’m a native English speaker. And I love helping the hundred thousand students who listen to
us every month. Every week we give you two English lessons in the form of podcasts. So
listen to Adept English. You’ll be on your way to speaking fluent English in no time. Hi and welcome to this latest podcast from
Adept English. This is our Monday podcast and therefore it’s slightly longer than
our Thursday podcast. But we put out two podcasts every week, so that you can practise your
English language understanding – and using this, improve your fluency. One of the things which can be difficult when
you come to understand English is accent. ‘Accent’ is spelt A-C-C-E-N-T – and
it means the way that you speak, the way that you pronounce words, especially when it’s
different to the standard way of saying the words, the standard pronunciation. And it’s
usually to do with where you come from. In the UK, there are lots of regional accents.
So some British Accent Practice is a good idea. If you listen to Adept English regularly,
you’ll be used to my voice and my way of pronouncing things. Yet my accent isn’t
quite standard English. I’m from the North of England, so I’ve got a slightly northern
accent. It’s not very strong, because I was only 18 years old when I left the north
of England – so now I’ve got more of a general English accent. So don’t worry,
if you sound like me, because you listen to Adept English a lot! People from the UK will
be able to understand you well. My accent is only noticeable on certain words – so
I say ‘bath’ and ‘grass’, with a short ‘a’ sound in the middle. If you’re from
the south of the UK, you would say ‘baaath’ and ‘graaass’ – but that difference is
not enough to mean that people don’t understand you. However, some regional accents can be very
strong – and some are difficult even for English people to understand. When I say ‘regional
accents’ – ‘regional’ means they come from a particular region, a particular area.
So some British Accent Practice – practise at understanding certain British accents will
be helpful to you in your learning. So the accent I’m going to look at today is the
Scottish accent. So here is an example of a man talking with
a Scottish accent. There are a number of Scottish accents, but just let’s go with a general
one. I’ve just chosen this from YouTube and he is talking about salmon fishing. He’s
standing by the side of a river, watching another man who is learning to fish for salmon.
So ‘fish’ F-I-S-H are animals which swim in water – and which we sometimes catch
and eat. So the verb for catching fish is ‘to fish’. And salmon, S-A-L-M-O-N is
the kind of fish here. And salmon live in rivers. And the Scottish actually are famous
for producing salmon. So the Scottish man is standing by a river, watching one of his
students learning to fish and he’s asked ‘How’s this person doing, this person
who is learning to fish for salmon?’ And this is the Scottish man’s reply. See how
much of it you can understand. “He’s doing very well at the moment actually. Erm…he just needs to slow things down, just a little bit. And he just wants to take his time on his forward cast. We’ll have him….by the end, by the end of the morning, we’ll have him…all that’ll be sorted out, like. But the secret is that you give the people their space. Let them get in the river, let them fish, let them enjoy the fishing. Let them feel their rods – don’t be on their case all day, like. I can soon sort it out – this takes five minutes. here’s a perfect example. Only been fishing for the last twenty minutes and look at that – perfect anchor point, perfect loop going across the river.” So, I don’t know how much of that you understood?
At this point, you may want to look at the transcript, the written version of this podcast,
which as always, you can find on our website at adeptenglish.com. The transcript may help
you. But British Accent Practice is difficult, so we could break this task of understanding
down a bit more. If I read out the transcript – if I read
out to you what the man with the Scottish accent is saying first of all, it may be easier.
Then when I’ve done that, I’ll run through any vocabulary that‘s difficult or that
may be difficult. Then when you play the podcast through a second time and listen again to
the man speaking, I think you’ll understand some more! So here is what he said, but see
if you can understand better with my accent, which you’ve heard before. So he says:- “He’s doing very well at the moment actually.
Erm…he just needs to slow things down, just a little bit. And he just wants to take his
time on his forward cast. We’ll have him….by the end, by the end of the morning, we’ll
have him…all that’ll be sorted out, like. But the secret is that you give the people
their space. Let them get in the river, let them fish, let them enjoy the fishing. Let
them feel their rods – don’t be on their case all day, like. I can soon sort it out
– this takes five minutes. There’s a perfect example. Only been fishing for the last twenty
minutes and look at that – perfect anchor point, perfect loop going across the river.” So maybe you could understand that a little
more easily? Just some vocabulary to understand here. He
says ‘He’s doing very well at the moment actually. He just needs to slow things down,
just a little bit’. So the man is commenting on the other man’s progress in learning
to fish. And as often with any new skill – it’s a good idea to go slowly. He then says “He
just needs to take his time on the forward cast”. So, if you imagine someone fishing
with a rod – that’s like a stick – and a line, so a thin piece of rope or chord,
with a hook on the end – exactly what you use to catch fish in a river. The ‘forward
cast’ refers to how the man throws the line into the river. If you’ve ever fished, you’ll
know that how you ‘cast’, how you throw the line is important. So the ‘forward cast’
– just means how the man is throwing the line forward – and ‘forward’ just means in
front of him, in front of himself. The next sentence is difficult, because the
man starts a sentence, and then appears to change his mind and says what he means another
way. So he says ‘We’ll have him….by the end of the morning, we’ll have him…’
It sounds as though he’s going to say ‘We’ll have him fishing really well’. But instead
of saying this, the man says ‘all that’ll be sorted out’. So the meaning is the same
– the verb ‘to sort out’ in English is something that we use quite a lot. Usually
if you ‘sort something out’, it means you solve the problem, you make the situation
OK. He then says ‘The secret is that you give people their space. Let them get in the
river, let them fish, let them enjoy the fishing.’ OK – so that’s like any good teacher – let
the person learning have some space, let them discover and learn for themselves. He then
says ‘Let them feel their rods – don’t be on their case all day, like’. So firstly
‘Let them feel their rods’ – the rod is the part of the fishing equipment which is
like a stick – so we would talk about ‘a fishing rod’. So the man is saying ‘Let
people get a feel for the rod, let them get used to how the fishing rod feels’. And
he says ‘Don’t be on their case all day, like’. The verb ‘to be on someone’s
case’ – means that you’re speaking to them all the time, reminding them of their
errors, nagging them, if you like. It’s the opposite of ‘give them space to learn’.
So it’s quite a common phrase ‘to be on someone’s case’. If I would like my daughter
to tidy her bedroom – which is a horrible mess sometimes – it’s necessary for me
to be ‘on her case’. But if you’re learning something and you’re really interested in
it, the worst thing is to have someone ‘on your case’. You need space to be left to
learn. So ‘Don’t be on their case all day, like’. What about the word ‘like’
at the end of that sentence? It’s just an expression that people use. It’s very colloquial
– you wouldn’t hear somebody say that if they were reading the news. But sometimes
people add expressions like this to their sentences. It’s like the word ‘Well…’
when people go ‘Um…well…’ It doesn’t really mean a lot. It doesn’t add a lot
of meaning. So not just British Accent Practice then, but also recognising colloquialisms
that English speakers use – like ‘…,like’. The man goes on ‘I can soon sort it out
– it takes five minutes’. So that’s probably easy to understand – I think he
means that if anyone has a question, or a problem – he can advise, he can teach them
really quickly. For the last couple of sentences, just picture the scene or go and look at it
on YouTube. The man is standing talking by the river and one of his students, one of
the people learning to fish, is standing right in the river, up to the tops of his legs in
the water, but casting his fishing rod really well. So the man is talking now about how
quickly it’s possible to learn to fish like this. He says “There’s a perfect example.
Only been fishing for the last twenty minutes and look at that – perfect anchor point, perfect
loop going across the river.” When he says ‘perfect anchor point’ – he’s talking
about how the man has positioned his feet, how he’s firmly standing in the river as
if he’s ‘anchored’. He’s not going to be pushed over by the water. An ‘anchor’
– ‘A-N-C-H-O-R’ is what you use to secure a boat – it’s like a metal hook. So no
metal hook here, but the use of the verb ‘to anchor’, means to fix firmly – so the
other man has fixed his feet firmly in the river, as if he’s anchored. The Scottish
man then comments also ‘Perfect loop going across the river’. ‘Perfect’ means no
errors, no problems – and a loop? Well, here he’s talking about the shape that the
line makes when it’s cast, when it’s thrown. A loop is almost a circle in shape – but
it’s the shape made when a piece of rope or chord, here ‘fishing line’, crosses
itself. So he’s really commenting on the way that his student is fishing really well
– ‘after only twenty minutes’. What’s really important about this piece,
is not so much the vocabulary, though I think we’ve covered some useful words. The purpose
here is more to give you some British Accent Practice – with the Scottish accent. So now
hopefully you’ve understood the meaning of what the man is saying – you’ve heard
me say it – and we’ve run through the vocabulary. Now it’s time to play this podcast
again – possibly several times – and listen to the recording of the Scottish man again.
See if you can understand what he’s saying this time. It will mean that you’ve had
some good British Accent Practice and that if you meet someone with a Scottish accent,
you’ll be more prepared. Good luck! Let us know how you find this podcast, whether
it’s helpful, and if you want us to do more of these with different accents. If you go
to the transcript, you can find the link to the video on YouTube as well. Enough for now. Have a lovely day. Speak to
you again soon. Goodbye. That’s the end of this podcast. Don’t forget
to visit our website for other podcasts. You can sign up for our free seven day course.
And if you’re really serious about learning English course one is ready for you to buy
and download. Adept English helping you become fluent in English.

3 thoughts on “British Accent Practice: Test Your English Listening Skills – Learn English Podcast 196

  1. If you have any other British accents you would like us to help you with then please just ask us in the comment. Thanks 🙂 Also if your new to our style of videos you need to turn on CC (closed captions/subtitles) to get the best use of the video.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *