BONUS EPISODE: Nissan’s Jeremy Meadows on Working With Lucasfilm, ILM and More

BONUS EPISODE: Nissan’s Jeremy Meadows on Working With Lucasfilm, ILM and More


– Hey, Rebel Rouser; I’m Allen Voivod, and this is a bonus
episode of Star Wars 7×7. Most of us Star Wars fans, unfortunately, will not have the opportunity to attend a red carpet gala premiere
of a Star Wars movie. Most of us will not get the opportunity to work directly with
Industrial Light and Magic or Skywalker Sound or the
Lucasfilm Story Group, but maybe, just maybe the next best thing would be getting to
talk to somebody who has and who is wonderfully candid
and happy about sharing his experiences doing all of these things, and that brings us to Jeremy Meadows. He is the Senior Manager
for Marketing Strategy and Integration at Nissan North America, and Nissan has been
involved with Lucasfilm for the last three movies, for Rogue One, The Last Jedi, and Solo. I had the pleasure of meeting him originally back at
Celebration Orlando in 2017, and he and I have become
friends over the years. He’s just a joy of a person in general, let alone a joy of a Star
Wars fan in specific. It’s been wonderful to talk to him over the past couple of years,
not just for interviews, but just general conversations as well, just two people shooting
the breeze over life, and kids and families, and
work and all that fun stuff. Anyway, I had the chance
to talk to Jeremy again, for the whole Solo promotion
that’s going on with Nissan, and to really dig into things like what the red carpet
premiere was like for Solo: A Star Wars Story,
and about the making of the commercial that
got done, which features, what you would think to be
actual Star Wars footage, but you’ll find out what
it’s really made of, which is kind of fascinating stuff, and about how he gets to
work with ILM and Lucasfilm, Skywalker Sound, as part of that, and the whole Best in the
Galaxy Customizer thing that you’ve been hearing
about on the podcast. Well, there’s a lot more thought that goes into that than you might expect. I’m not going to spoil
anything anymore than that. Instead, I’m just going to say hey, let’s just cut right to it and let’s get into my conversation with Jeremy Meadows, from Nissan North America,
and you can hear all about some very cool insider Lucasfilm stuff. Jeremy Meadows, it’s so
great to see you again. Welcome back to Star
Wars 7×7, how are you? – I’m great, my friend. Thanks for having me
back; I’m real excited. – Oh yeah, it’s a fine
time to be excited too, with Solo: A Star Wars
Story coming out in … You know what, I have been
saying into home video. I still am not sure that that’s
entirely correct, you know? Home video goes back to the days when we had the VHS
cassettes and what not. – That’s right.
– I mean, it’s still, you know, coming to streaming
services on Friday the 14th and to Blu-ray and new 4K
Ultra UHD on September 25th. That’s very exciting stuff,
and Nissan is of course, a part of this whole Solo
in-home promotion too, which is fascinating, but you guys have been involved with
Solo from the very start. So that’s where I want to
start, by talking to you, because we didn’t get
a chance to talk about your time at the Solo premiere. We had a discussion back in December when you got to go to
The Last Jedi premiere, which was really awesome to hear about, but I’d love to hear about
your time at the Solo premiere. Are you just getting to be a
jaded Hollywood celebrity now? “Ah, I’m at another red
carpet premiere, oh yeah. “Hollywood, again; shut down
Hollywood Boulevard, again.” What is this experience like for you now that you’ve done
it over and over again? – Well, I will tell you it’s not old hat. (Allen laughs) It is exciting every single time. Every single time, I’m literally throughout the whole
night, pinching myself. Literally, I do it, and I’m just like, “This cannot be real.” (Allen laughs) I never in a million
years, throughout my life, and I’ve been a fan since
I was very very young, so my earliest memories
of being just in existence was tied to Star Wars. – Mmhm.
– I never would have thought I would have been at a
Star Wars red carpet event, let alone now, three of them. (Allen laughs) I’ve been also not only
at the red carpet events, but been at other opening night galas. We did a big one for
The Last Jedi with fans. We did another special
screening in New York for Solo with some media and some others. I’ve literally been
able to see some things and do some things that I never thought I would have ever been
able to do in my life, especially related to Star Wars. – It’s still wonderful and brand new, practically every single
time, it sounds like. – Oh yeah. Oh yeah. I’m just enjoying every moment, whether it’s going to see the
Solo movie at the premiere, or going to Celebration,
which was my very first one ever I went to last year. Every moment’s been pretty
exciting to be a part of. – At the premiere last
time, for The Last Jedi, you had all of the customized vehicles, the special one-off creations, and this year you did another one as well, the Lando’s Millennium Falcon, yes? – Yeah, we decided this time, we wanted to really celebrate something that was really unique
and special for Solo. I’m sorry, if you’re
going to do a vehicle, you have to do the Millennium Falcon. – Right.
– That’s the only way to do it and we decided to take it
up even a bigger notch. We’ve done a couple of them now. I mean, this would have been our number nine car that we’ve done. Actually, technically
number ten, that we did out of all the vehicles that
we’ve done since Rogue One. – Mmhm.
– We decided this time, “You know, we’ve done exteriors. “This time, let’s do an interior as well.” – Ah, okay, yeah yeah.
– That was something that was brand new for the vehicle,
so we have a great exterior, but we really got into it on the interior, because on the other ones,
the windows were darkened, you couldn’t see what
was kind of happening on the inside of the vehicle. – Mmhm.
– We had to be very very creative about how we built
the car and customized it, because everybody would sit inside the car and see what it’s really, truly made of. That was really the best part
of having the car on display wherever we took it, whether
it was at the red carpet, or the New York event. We even took it to
Lucasfilm headquarters and– – Oh, wow! – When people sat in the car, literally, they said they felt like they were sitting in the Millennium Falcon. – Of course it has to be Lando’s Falcon, because quite honestly,
if you built Han’s Falcon, I mean, it would still be cool, but it probably wouldn’t
look as nice. (chuckles) – Yeah, it would be a
little bit more dingy, and dirty, and beat up. You know, he and Chewy kind
of put it through the ringer. – Mmhm.
– Let alone the Kessel Run, then with all their
other adventures, right? – Yeah, exactly. I can’t imagine you (laughs)
the thought if you driving a, you know, Nissan show
car Millennium Falcon of the version that managed
to crash land on Sa-ver-ine at the end of Solo: A Star
Wars Story, ruining the landing gear and everything
and just smashing down. Yeah, I don’t think that–
– That’s a great scene. – It is a great scene, definitely. Probably would not have gone
well on the red carpet though, right, with that version of
the Falcon, I would imagine? – No, but even with that all being said, there was one little touch
that we still wanted to bring into the interior of the Falcon that is more Han than Lando. We actually have a pair of dice hanging from the rear view mirror. – Oh, excellent. Where is this car now? Not just that car, but
I mean, as you said, either nine or ten of these
very special show cars that you guys have created. Where are they? What happens to them once all
the fanfare has died down? – Well, actually they’re
all right now in storage. We have them locked away
in safe hiding and keep. We’re holding onto them for right now. I mean, sometimes with
some of these custom cars that we do for Nissan, not
just these Star Wars ones, but some other ones, after a while they do have to be disposed. These ones, we’ve worked
closely with Lucasfilm, and we’re hanging onto them. We’re seeing if maybe
there’s a future opportunity where we can display them again. – Basically, what you’re saying is that somewhere in America, presumably, Nissan has a storehouse
that’s kind of like the storehouse at the end
of Raiders of the Lost Ark, where there’s this giant
thing and it’s got (laughs) it’s stored off some
place and it’ll be … I mean, obviously it’s got to be cataloged and stored somewhere. I’m just, you know,
(laughs) riffing on it– – You’re not far off, you’re not far off. We have a couple different
places we’ll keep vehicles at, that we want to keep them
kind of under safe keep. Yeah, you kind of walk in just like you’re walking into a car museum. – (laughs) Are they
actually where you could walk in and see them? They’re not shrink-wrapped
for their safety or anything like that? – They are covered. They are covered for keeping
the dust off of them, and birds, and anything else that kind of happens to get in there. We do get them out every once in a while to check on them and make sure
they’re in good condition, but yeah, they’re under lock and storage and in good safe keeping,
except for two of them. You may see one of them
behind me right now. – Ah, yes. Yeah. Let’s talk about that. I see one of them, and before we actually
started the recording you were kind enough to
show me the other one. Clearly, we are not doing some weird forced perspective thing where
you would actually fit in that car, but do tell us about
the car that is behind you. I will say that, if you are
listening to this episode on audio, then you would definitely be doing yourself a favor to check it out on YouTube or Facebook,
so that way you can see the video version, and you can
see inside Jeremy’s office. This is actually his office, and this is some of the
amazing memorabilia, paraphernalia, that’s in here. Tell me about that Nissan, that custom Rogue that
we’re looking at behind you. – Technically, these would
be numbers 11 and 12 then, I guess within the custom vehicle lineup. These two cars, and this is number one; I’ll show the other one in a moment, they were made as just concept cars, just kind of something for fun. We had these at the red
carpet for the movie. In particular, we had
it at the after party. – Ah, okay. – We had a special display stand
to show off these two cars, and people could take pictures
of them and with them. We did two of them,
because you know, yeah, we’ve got Solo over here
behind me on my shoulder there, you know, represented in
a custom 3D printed Rogue. However, you can’t have
Solo without Chewy. (Allen laughs) We had to do a Chewy car,
and these are to scale. We had the pair of them on display at the red carpet after party. Fans really loved them; they
thought they were a lot of fun. Although, I will tell you we
got a lot of heads that turned when we were carrying … We had to take these two cars by hand. I was one of them; I was
carrying the Solo car. One of my colleagues was
carrying the Chewy car, and we carried them from
the Roosevelt Hotel, where we were doing a pre-party at, and we carried them from there
over to the Dolby Theater in one of their ballrooms, and so we’re waling
down Hollywood Boulevard carrying these two cars. We got a lot of people like, “What are you carrying in
your arms right now?” (laughs) – Oh, you weren’t even
carrying them in boxes or anything like that?
– No. – They were just out? – We just decided to have a little fun, and Lucasfilm gave us the
green light to be able just to walk down the street carrying them to kind of raise a little buzz, I mean, because after all they were
building a Millennium Falcon on Hollywood Boulevard, so– – Right.
– There was already some excitement in the
air, so to see two people walking down the street
carrying these cars, was pretty head-turning. (chuckles) – Would you mind? Can we get a little closer
look at the Chewy car, just because there’s–
– Sure. – They, I mean, the fur
on it is just fantastic, and I don’t know if folks
can necessarily see it. Coming right over the windshield– – Let me spin the camera around. – Oh, okay. – [Jeremy] All right, there we go. – Oh yeah, the bandolier
strap, I thought was just an excellent addition there too. – [Jeremy] All the way up. – These were 3D printed and hand-painted, or in the case of Chewy’s,
(chuckles) hand-decorated, and that’s fake fur, I think
you told me, is that right? – [Jeremy] Yeah, that’s all
fake fur; that’s not real, but we did really dye it to make sure it kind of had those multiple colors, kind of like what Chewy
would realistically have. We referenced a lot of images
that Lucasfilm gave us, just so we made sure that
it was film accurate. – It’s so amazing, and then
that’s the range trooper helmet that you guys
were giving away as well. – [Jeremy] Oh yeah, and so that was produced by Gentle Giant. This is not one of the
customer sweepstakes helmets that we gave away; this is
actually the pre-production model that I approved before
they went to production. – Ah.
– This one sits in my office as a keepsake.
– Nice. – It is accurate for what the customers, one out of the 100 that won during the May sweepstakes that we did. – Mmhm, yeah, your office is a wonderful little museum in its own right. That’s some amazing stuff, and
that’s actual leather work. Oh, and there’s his blaster too. – [Jeremy] Yeah, that whole
thing is, as you’ll see here, it is actually 3D printed all the way down to the bottom of the holster. It’s pretty detailed in
how they put it together, and wheels painted and put on there, and even our Nissan badge
and everything on the front. It’s a lot of fun. – That is just amazing stuff. Good heavens, thank you very much for giving everybody watching
this a closer look. That’s really awesome. All right, so speaking of customizations, this year you also continued the digital customization situation. You did the best in the galaxy customizer for Solo: A Star Wars Story, and so you’ve got the Altima,
the Titan, and the Rogue, and it’s always fascinating
to me how easy it is, it seams at least, just from
the end consumer perspective, of just going to, you know, pick a car, and then you know, pick your
exterior, pick your interior, pick, you know, pick your wheels, all these things that, just it’s practically magical in its way, and we just, we take it for granted, but you know, you got
to do it again for Solo, just like you did with The Last Jedi. What goes into creating something like the best in the galaxy customizer? What do you have to go
through with Lucasfilm, and even internally at
Nissan, to decide, you know, these are the exteriors,
these are the interiors, this is the naming of things,
these are the (stammers) phrases that we want to include
on the pillars in the back. How do you go about that whole process? – Well, it’s a collaboration effort between Nissan and Lucasfilm. We actually work with a
story group to find out what are the important
vehicles that they want to tell as a part of the story of Solo. – Okay.
– They’ll give us a whole range of, “Here’s
options, but here’s definitely “our priorities that we want to highlight “as part of this customizer experience.” Then the same thing with the, in Aurebesh, the phrases that you
can put on the vehicle, that you can do that
in Aurebesh or English, and all the way down to the colors. Everything about the
vehicle, we share with them, “Well, here’s the cars that we would like to see customized,” and then we would say them, “What is the story you
want to tell about Solo “through this customizer?” It’s not just a pretty face. There’s actually a story
kind of to it, right? I mean, you’ve got of course,
the Millennium Falcon, Lando’s Falcon, but
you have Han’s speeder, you have Moloch’s speeder. You’ve got a variety
of vehicles there that really help to tell the story of Solo: A Star Wars Story. It was just really great to be
able to work with those folks and understand what that storyline is, and bring it to life in this unique way. – Being a Star Wars fan as you are, going through this process
means that you get to learn things about the
movie that perhaps you might not have discovered otherwise until you were actually seeing it in the theater for the first time. How do you deal with that as a fan? Is there a part of you that
is really amazingly excited to be getting this
knowledge for beforehand? Or is there a part of you that is trying to firewall yourself like, “I need to know this for work,
but I’m trying not to learn about it so I can have
the full experience.”? How do you personally handle this stuff? – It is tricky; it really is, of not getting so wrapped
up into what all of this is, and not getting too wrapped
up into knowing too much. It’s really, really tricky. The fan in me, I’d try
not to, in the past, know a whole lot going into
a movie, but for my job, I have to know a lot what’s
going on for the movie, in order to understand what stories that Lucasfilm wants to tell, what images do they want to portray to customers and to fans. Because of that, I do have to know a lot. The good news is, the team at Lucasfilm, they know that I’m a fan, they know that people
at Nissan are also fans, and so they tell us, really honestly, just enough to do the project
that we’re working on, and they leave a lot of surprises. I remember the very first project, working on with the team at
Lucasfilm, was Rogue One. – Right. – We were actually in the
studio filming some scenes for some of the early commercials
that we did with Rogue One. That morning is when the final trailer for Rogue One came out. It hit everything at like,
6:00 a.m. in the morning, or something like that; I was out in LA. I wake up in my hotel, I
get the alerts, I watch it, I get to the set, and
one of the team members from Lucasfilm say, “Hey, have
you seen the trailer yet?” and I said, “Yeah, already
about half a dozen times.” (Allen laughs) They said, “So, what do
you think?” and I was like, “Well, now some things are answered,” because again, they
don’t tell me everything, but I know enough to get the project done. They said, “So you
figured some stuff out?” and I said, “Well, I
think a couple things, “but still there’s a lot of
things I have questions on.” They said, “Well, that’s good because “we want you to be
surprised and entertained “and you’re never going
to see the ending coming.” – Ah.
– I really appreciate that. – Mmhm.
– You know, and I got to see, just like everybody else in the theater, when they were seeing
it for the first time, that classic, now classic
scene with Vader at the end– – Yeah.
– And Leia at the end, which just blew everybody away, right? – Mmhm.
– I didn’t know about Tarkin, for example.
– Okay. – The same thing with Solo. I knew a lot going into Solo. I knew about there was
going to be a special moment where Han and Chewy meet, but I didn’t know exactly the details. I just knew it was going to be a special, not what you would expect, kind
of moment, where they meet. – Mmhm. – You’re going to see some
unique opportunities where their relationship is starting to build, and I knew a couple of examples, but I didn’t know the whole story. Then when I get a chance
to finally see the movie, I’m entertained just like you. Of course, spoiler alert here, I did not know about Maul at the end. – Okay. – That was a complete surprise. (Allen laughs) Literally, me and everybody
else in the theater, when we were seeing it for the first time, all gasped, same time. – Mmhm.
– It was amazing. – That’s obviously then,
why there’s no Maul themed customization in the best in the galaxy customizer then, too. – Yeah, exactly. To that point, so I’m at the red carpet; I love telling this story, and you know, I’m there
from the moment it opens until just before the movie starts, and then I go into the theater and I get the great opportunity to
watch it with the filmmakers and the cast, which is pretty exciting. One of the first people that
came down the red carpet is Ray Park.
– Oh boy, okay. – Of course, I didn’t
think anything other than, “Oh my gosh, this is Ray Park,” and he had his family with him. It was really a pleasure
to be able to show his family and him, and I had his son sitting in
the front seat of the Rogue, the custom one we did, and showed him, “Hey, if you push this button, “it actually fires up the hyper-drive, “and you hear the sounds,
and Chewy roars at you.” That was so much fun,
and I just thanked Ray for bringing such a great
character to the screen, and being such a great character also too, with some of the other movies he’s done. I’m a movie fan, in general,
and it was really great to just talk with him for a few minutes. There wasn’t a whole lot of people coming down the red carpet, so I think I had ten minutes with him. – Wow, that’s great. – That was really pretty amazing to be able to get that amount of time. Then of course, I see the movie. – Mmhm. – I was like, “Oh, that’s why
he was at the red carpet.” – Yeah. – Ironically, later after the movie, there’s the after party where we have these little cars behind me on display. Ray and his family were at
the table right next to me and my Nissan colleagues. (Allen laughs) I go over to him and I said, “Ray, now I know why you were here, “and wow, that was awesome.” – Mmhm.
– “That was really awesome.” He said, “Thanks, it was really hard “keeping a secret from everybody.” – (laughs) Obviously, he didn’t tell you while he had the time there.
– Nope. – Yeah, and it’s not a
given because, I mean, Ewan McGregor is showing up
at a bunch of these things and he hasn’t been in any of them, aside from just that
little voice casting thing in The Force Awakens, very briefly, but– – Right.
– Yeah, so yeah, you never know, it could
be a complete red herring, or it could actually be the real deal. I’m glad to hear though that he didn’t go, “Psst, you know, hey, keep your eyes out,” or anything like that.
– Right. No, he did a great job of
not telling me anything, or anybody, obviously, because
we were all just floored that Maul was at the end. – Yeah, there’s one other
thing I want to ask you about, and you mentioned commercials earlier. There’s one commercial that,
at least that I’ve seen, for the Solo campaign, and deals with the pro
pilot assist technology, the Nissan intelligent
mobility technology. I wanted to ask you about that, because of the filming aspect there. There’s a scene that is another unusual, and I believe a custom scene, but I think first I got to ask you
to just briefly explain what the pro pilot assist technology is, so that way we can have a more
literate conversation about the scene that’s shown in the commercial for the filming of movie. – At its basic essence,
what pro pilot assist does, it keeps you between
the lines on the road. The camera system and the
sensors that are in the car help keep you centered between the lines, even when you’re on a curve on the road. You’re on the highway
and you’re going along; it’ll keep you centered. What it’ll also do, is it’ll help you at stop and start situations
when you’re in heavy traffic. It’ll bring you to a complete
stop and resume speed as the car in front of you starts to move, so a little work together
to give you this really unique driving experience. You get to kind of relax
and enjoy the drive just a little bit more, and really that’s what
it’s ultimately all about, is enjoying the drive. That’s what pro pilot assist does for you. When we were trying to figure
out a way to communicate that to people, about keeping centered, and that’s one of the heart and soul parts of what the pro pilot
assist technology does, we were trying to figure
out what’s a unique way from a Star Wars perspective,
that we could tell that story, but also to bring that
into the real world. In brainstorming with the Lucasfilm team and with our team here at Nissan, we said, “You know, there’s a classic
scene from Empire Strikes Back “where the Falcon spins up
on its vertical axis there “and slipstreams right in
between the asteroids.” We said, “Is there anything like that, “that’s happening in Solo?” They said, “Well,” … Again, this is at, “We’ll tell
you enough about the project, “but we’re not going to
actually tell you too much,” and they came back and they said, “Well, you know what, we
can’t tell you directly, “but what we can do is we can create “something for you that’s custom,” so all of that footage that you’ve seen in our commercial is custom. That was done specifically for us, to help us tell that
story of staying centered, regardless of what other kind of crazy is going on around you. We wanted to take that
then, into the real world. That’s where we came up
with the idea of the bridge, and the semis, and how things are lit, and how it was filmed. We wanted to have that
parallel kind of example between the two. – Where was … The reason I’m asking is
because the bridge seemed, looks very much like the Zakim in Boston, which is not too far away from me, but I don’t think it was quite, because the cityscape itself
looks a little bit different. Where was that filmed, do you know? – That was on the eastern span of the Bay Bridge in San Francisco. – Ah, okay, all right.
– Going into Oakland. – Nice.
– It’s a fairly new structure that was just built not that long ago, and it’s more prepared for
earthquakes and things like that. It’s brand new; it was only opened a few months before we filmed there. – Got you, and the dog is
ridiculously cute too. (chuckles) – Yeah, we wanted to have a
fun little moment in there, of showing our hero
driver and the passenger being confident with the technology, but wanted to have a
little fun nod to kind of something that was like Chewy, but not. That was our little Chewy. – Did Phoebe Waller-Bridge
then do brand new lines especially for this commercial then, or is this like an audio
double kind of situation? Or are you even allowed to say? – It’s an audio double type of situation. We used some of that audio from the movie into our commercial. – Got it. Excellent. They, Lucasfilm said,
“Hey, we’ve got an idea,” and so they put somebody
in a Chewy costume, and got an L3, and an audio double, and did all of the special effects. Did ILM then get involved with
the filming of the Falcon? Because you see the exterior
of the Falcon in space flying toward two star destroyers. Was ILM involved in this too? – Oh yeah, Lucasfilm, ILM, sound design was done by Skywalker Sound. – Ah. – We worked with the full team
across the Lucasfilm company. It was pretty amazing. – That is fantastic. That’s another thing too, where you have worked
with all of these outfits previously for The Last
Jedi, and for Rogue One, and yet it’s still not, you know, “Ah, it’s Tuesday,” right? – Right, “Oh, I’m at the ranch again.” – Yeah, “again,” yeah. (laughs) That is really wonderful,
and I’m very glad actually that they chose that instead of the scene toward the beginning of Solo, where he’s got that speeder that he stole, and he wedges it in between
the walls of the shipyard. – Yeah. – I don’t think that would
necessarily illustrate the technology as effectively. (laughs) – No, we did explore that area, because that’s a really
exciting chase scene, and a lot of that … You know, it reminded me a
lot of some of the classic kind of car chases that
happened in classic movies. That’s what it reminded me
of, and the hot rod scene and things like that, but
again, it just didn’t feel right to tell the story of pro pilot assist. – Right.
– While very cool, we said we needed to find something else that helps tell our technology
story a little bit better. – Yeah, he would have
had to get through that. Otherwise, yeah, it doesn’t quite, yes, you know, doesn’t quite
shine it in the same light that it should be shined in. – Exactly, exactly. – Well, I just want to say I’m so glad to get to talk to you again, not just as somebody who’s doing all these very fascinating things for
Nissan, and with Lucasfilm, and ILM, and with Skywalker Sound, but just your passion is always
incredibly evident for this. I mean, for folks who are
watching this on video, that is Jeremy’s office
at Nissan in Tennessee, so I mean, the Solo poster there, and he was gracious enough
to give me a video tour of the office, and you would be astounded at some of the other things
that he has in there. This is absolutely something
he’s very passionate about, if I may speak about
you in the third person while we’re talking together. (chuckles) If there’s anybody who would
be involved in a situation where a licenser is working
with Lucasfilm on a thing, you know, it would be, you’d be hard-pressed
to find anybody better, or more passionate, or
more committed to doing it, and doing it right, and
telling a very authentic story than Jeremy Meadows,
who is a Senior Manager for Marketing Strategy and Integration, I should say properly,
with Nissan North America, and just a wonderful nice
guy to talk with in general. Jeremy, thank you so much for taking time out of your busy day. I know you’ve got a lot of different fascinating projects on your plate, and I’m so grateful to be able
to spend the time with you, and I’m sure our listeners are as well. Thank you again for taking the time and talking about all these amazing things you’ve done with Lucasfilm. – Well, happy to do so, Allen. Thanks for having me on, and I can’t wait to listen to the show. I just listened to the
other show this morning. It was great hearing
about the novelization. I enjoy listening to your show, and have been a big fan for a long time, so happy to be a part of it again. – [Narrator] This podcast is
not endorsed or sponsored (yet) by Lucasfilm Ltd., Disney,
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and information purposes only. Star Wars, the Star Wars logo,
all names and pictures of Star Wars characters, vehicles
and any other Star Wars related items are registered
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