Advanced English LISTENING Quiz: Can you understand?

Advanced English LISTENING Quiz: Can you understand?


Vanessa: Hi, I’m Vanessa from SpeakEnglishWithVanessa.com. Are you ready to test your listening skills? Let’s do it. Do you want to understand movies and TV shows
and fast English-speakers? Yes, of course you do, but there are countless
reductions and linking in English that make it difficult, so the best way to understand
fast English conversations is to study fast English conversations. And that’s what we’re going to do today. We’re going to be listening to five quick
English conversations, and I’m going to give you three sentences for each conversation. I want you to guess which sentence you hear
in each conversation. If this exercise is too easy for you, then
this is my challenge. I challenge you to not look at the screen,
but to try to write every single word that you hear from that conversation. This way, instead of listening for specific
words that you already know will happen in that conversation that I give to you, you’re
going to be trying to write just from your listening skills every word that you hear. These conversations that you’re about to hear
are all part of the 30 Day Listening Challenge, PACK 4, which is open now until December 31st. If you’d like to join hundreds of other English
learners who are deciding to start the new year 2020 by improving your listening skills,
great, you can click on the link up here or in the description to find out more about
the listening challenge. Are you ready to listen to the first conversation? I’m going to give you three sentences that
I want you to listen for. I want you to choose which one is going to
be in the conversation. Let’s take a look at those sentences. You didn’t take it seriously. You didn’t take in seriously. You didn’t take on seriously. Let’s listen to the conversation clip and
I want you to choose. Did you hear number one, two or three? All right, let’s listen a couple of times
to the clip. Dan: I had probably a poor work ethic. Vanessa: Oh yeah, you didn’t take it seriously? Dan: I didn’t have to try very hard in high
school. Vanessa: As in you could do okay and not try? Dan: I didn’t have to study it that much to
get by in my high school, because my high school didn’t have very high standards. Vanessa: Oh, I see. Dan: I had probably a poor work ethic. Vanessa: Oh yeah, you didn’t take it seriously? Dan: I didn’t have to try very hard in high
school. Vanessa: As in you could do okay and not try? Dan: I didn’t have to study it that much to
get by in my high school, because my high school didn’t have very high standards. Vanessa: Oh, I see. Which sentence did you hear? Did you hear number one, “You didn’t take
it seriously.”? I hope so. In this conversation, Dan said that he didn’t
work really hard in high school, and I clarified his statement by saying, “You didn’t take
it seriously.” What is it in this sentence? It’s school. You didn’t take school seriously. This is a wonderful expression, to take something
seriously. Let’s listen to that clip again, and now that
you know which sentence you’re listening for, and you know the general idea of the clip,
hopefully you’ll be able to hear it clear. Dan: I had probably a poor work ethic. Vanessa: Oh yeah, you didn’t take it seriously? Dan: I didn’t have to try very hard in high
school. I had probably a poor work ethic. Vanessa: Oh yeah, you didn’t take it seriously? Dan: I didn’t have to try very hard in high
school. Vanessa: Did you hear, “You didn’t take it
seriously.”? I hope so. Let’s go on to quiz question number two. While you listen to this clip, I want you
to guess which one of these sentences you’re actually hearing. Is it number one, you have be like five or
six years old. Number two, you have to be like five or six
years old, or number three, you have to been like five or six years old. Let’s listen to the clip and choose which
one you’re hearing. So they have it for all ages? James: Yes. Well, I think you have to be a certain age. You have to be like five or six years old. Vanessa: Oh, gotcha. So at least at that studio, are there quite
a few adults who are a part of the program? James: Yes, there are definitely more people
there. I am typically the oldest one in the place
for the most part. I’m 45. Vanessa: So they have it for all ages? James: Yes. Well, I think you have to be a certain age. You have to be like five or six years old. Vanessa: Oh, gotcha. So at least at that studio, are there quite
a few adults who are a part of the program? James: Yes, there are definitely more people
there. I am typically the oldest one in the place
for the most part. I’m 45. Vanessa: Which sentence did you hear? Did you hear number two, “You have to be like
five or six years old.”? Here in this clip, James is talking about
the minimum age to participate in the martial arts club that he’s a part of. It’s five or six years old. Did you also hear how old he is? Did you catch that number? He said 45. All right, we’re going to listen to that key
sentence a couple times so that you can hear, “You have to be like five or six years old.” Let’s listen. So they have it for all ages? James: Yes. Well, I think you have to be a certain age. You have to be like five or six years old. Vanessa: So they have it for all ages? James: Yes. Well, I think you have to be a certain age. You have to be like five or six years old. Vanessa: Did you hear, “You have to be like
five or six years old.”? I hope so. Let’s go on to quiz question number three. I want you to listen for which one of these
three sentences you hear. Number one, she spent up living with me for
seven months. Number two, she went up living with me for
seven months. Number three, she ended living with me for
seven months. Let’s listen to the clip, and I want you to
choose which sentence you hear. David: Actually, when I was there, I met a
girl from Montreal, Chantelle her name was. I saw her on the beach and I said, Oh, she’s
beautiful. I must meet her. She spoke no English. I spoke no French. Vanessa: That didn’t matter. David: She had a friend that was with her. They had come down from Montreal for a vacation
a couple of weeks, and she ended up living with me for seven months. Actually, when I was there, I met a girl from
Montreal, Chantelle her name was. I saw her on the beach and I said, Oh, she’s
beautiful. I must meet her. She spoke no English. I spoke no French. Vanessa: That didn’t matter. David: She had a friend that was with her. They had come down from Montreal for a vacation
a couple of weeks, and she ended up living with me for seven months. Vanessa: Which sentence did you hear? Did you hear number three, “She ended up living
with me for seven months.”? I hope so. In this quick conversation, David’s talking
about a special girl who he met and they didn’t speak the same language, but it didn’t matter. They lived together for seven months. He uses a great phrasal verb, to end up. “She ended up living with me for seven months.” We use this phrasal verb, to end up, to talk
about a conclusion, but it’s usually a surprising conclusion. For example, I checked into my flight to go
to New York city, and I ended up getting moved to first class. Woah, this is a surprising conclusion because
I didn’t pay for first-class, I didn’t expect to be in first-class, maybe they had some
extra seats or they needed to put someone else in the back of the plane, so we could
say, I ended up getting moved to first-class. Great. All right, let’s listen to that original clip
again so that you can hear a little bit more accurately, everything that we say. David: She had a friend that was with her. They had come down from Montreal for a vacation
a couple of weeks, and she ended up living with me for seven months. She had a friend that was with her. They had come down from Montreal for a vacation
a couple of weeks, and she ended up living with me for seven months. Vanessa: Did you hear, “…ended up.”? I hope so. Let’s go on to quiz question number four. I want you to listen for which one of these
three sentences you’re about to hear. Number one, I just kind of self-got myself
the rest. Number two, I just kind of self-taught myself
the rest. Number three, I just kind of self-bought myself
the rest. Let’s listen. Jessie: It actually started with a friend
of mine that was not Cherokee at all. Even though she had no native American heritage,
she was still interested in it. She taught me, and I would make the rooms
with different types of sticks, all different types. Vanessa: Yeah, it looks definitely all natural. Jessie: Yeah, all different types. Vanessa: She got into making dream catchers-
Jessie: And she showed me, and then I just kind of self-taught myself the rest. It actually started with a friend of mine
that was not Cherokee at all. Even though she had no native American heritage,
she was still interested in it. She taught me, and I would make the rooms
with different types of sticks, all different types. Vanessa: Yeah, it looks definitely all natural. Jessie: Yeah, all different types. Vanessa: She got into making dream catchers-
Jessie: And she showed me, and then I just kind of self-taught myself the rest. Vanessa: Which sentence did you hear? Did you hear number two, “I just kind of self-taught
myself the rest.”? I hope so. In this quick conversation clip, Jessie is
talking about learning a Native American craft called dream catchers. She explains that her friend who has no native
American heritage taught her some basics about how to make them, but Jessie self-taught. She taught herself the rest. What does this expression, the rest, mean? This means that she learned the remaining
part by herself. For example, I cleaned most of my house in
the morning, and then I cleaned the rest in the afternoon. I cleaned the remaining part of my house in
the afternoon. All right, let’s listen to that original clip
again, so that you can hear and hopefully catch those expressions. Let’s listen. She got into making dream catchers-
Jessie: And she showed me, and then I just kind of self-taught myself the rest. Vanessa: She got into making dream catchers-
Jessie: And she showed me, and then I just kind of self-taught myself the rest. Vanessa: Did you hear, “I just kind of self-taught
myself the rest.”? I hope so. Let’s move on to the final quiz question,
number five. This one’s a little bit tricky because we
speak at the same time as each other, but you’ve got it. Listen carefully. Which one of these three sentences are you
going to hear? Number one, they’re coming to the restaurant
to avoid that. Number two, they come into the restaurant
to avoid that. Number three, they’re come to the restaurant
to avoid that. Let’s listen. Kevin: I never got an autograph except one
time in all these years, and it was from David Bowie. Vanessa: Okay. Kevin: Because my chef was in love with David
Bowie, and it was just a big deal. Vanessa: Yeah, you can’t be the paparazzi
when they’re coming to the restaurant to avoid that. Kevin: Right. Tourists find out where they are. I never got an autograph except one time in
all these years, and it was from David Bowie. Vanessa: Okay. Kevin: Because my chef was in love with David
Bowie, and it was just a big deal. Vanessa: Yeah, you can’t be the paparazzi
when they’re coming to the restaurant to avoid that. Kevin: Right. Tourists find out they are. Vanessa: Which sentence did you hear? Did you hear sentence number one? “They’re coming to the restaurant to avoid
that.” I hope so. In this conversation clip, Kevin is talking
about his experience as a server in one of the most popular restaurants in Hollywood
where celebrities like to go to avoid tourists, to avoid paparazzi. It’s a hidden spot where they could feel safe. The second sentence that you were listening
for, they come into the restaurant to avoid that, it’s grammatically correct, but it’s
not what I said. So make sure you’re listening for exactly
what I said. “They’re coming to the restaurant to avoid
that.” All right, let’s listen to that quick clip
again so that you can pick up on this expression. Yeah, you can’t be the paparazzi when they’re
coming to the restaurant to avoid that. Kevin: Right. Tourists find out where they are. Vanessa: Yeah, you can’t be the paparazzi
when they’re coming to the restaurant to avoid that. Kevin: Right. Tourists find out where they are. Vanessa: How did you do? Did you hear, “They’re coming to the restaurant
to avoid that.”? I hope so. How did you do on this quiz? Let me know in the comments, what was your
score? Did you get all of them correct or maybe none? I hope that you can do this quiz again and
again so that you can test your listening skills. If the quiz was easy, like I mentioned at
the beginning, go back. Don’t look at those sample sentences, but
just listen to the audio and try to write exactly what you hear. See if you can pick up on every single word
without any hints from me. This is what we’ll be doing in the 30 Day
Listening Challenge, PACK 4. We’ll be boosting your listening skills so
that you can understand every fast native speaker conversation. You’ll be studying one conversation like this
every day, testing your listening skills, trying to write exactly what you hear, and
checking it to see, is it correct, and learning new expressions along the way. Join me and thousands of other English learners
around the world with the 30 Day Listening Challenge, PACK 4. For $30 you’ll get 30 lessons, one every day
during the month of January. You can click on the link up here or in the
description to learn more and to join us. Thanks so much for learning English with me,
and I’ll see you again next Friday for a new lesson here on my YouTube channel. Bye. The next step is to join the 30 day English
listening challenge. You’ll be on the right path to increasing
your listening skills and understanding fast English speakers. Don’t forget to subscribe to my YouTube channel
for more free lessons. Thanks so much. Bye.

61 thoughts on “Advanced English LISTENING Quiz: Can you understand?

  1. Vanessa I like the plants you have back in there!!! Make a video about that one day, and perhaps we can get more vocabulary about gardening! Or you could go to a nursery and show us how is it

  2. really I'm not native English speaker
    my score was 5 out of 5

    i am so happy it gives me more enthusiasm to keep English improving
    thx dear teacher i have got alot of from you
    don't know what to do in return what you taught me for the past and the present

  3. hi, Vanessa,
    thank you for this helpful lesson which improves our listening skills. i like this kind of lessons. thanks to you i've learned a lot of important expressions. i want to thank you for that. you have my respect and appreciation, always. you deserve all the best in life. i whish for you and your family all the best, everytime. our loveliest teacher, be always with us.
    i wish happy and healty years for you🤗

  4. What was your score? Let me know in the comments! 😊Continue learning English with me by joining the 30 Day Listening Challenge here 👉 https://www.speakenglishwithvanessa.com/listening/ It's only open until December 31st because the course begins on January 1st. See you then! ❤️

  5. All them was pretty easy for me, right before the audio I could already see the obvious grammar mistakes between the options. I'm happy for that.

  6. 4 out of 5. I missed the last one: I heard "they come in" instead of "they're coming in". An excellent listening exercise. Thank you and congrats Vanessa.

  7. Teacher. O que você fez para ser fluente em Inglês. Intercâmbio? É possível ser fluente estudando apenas pela internet?

  8. I am from viet nam. I have watched your video for a year. I improve my english by watching your the channel. Thanks, you are the best english teacher

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