13. Case Study – Chad Ressler

13. Case Study – Chad Ressler


– Welcome back to the
Mandarin Blueprint podcast. Today we have special guest, Chad Ressler, which we’re really excited about because Chad has been submitting all of these great stories and questions for the past several weeks, really since we started
the podcast, I think, and so, yeah, so welcome Chad. – Thanks, good to be here. – One of our super fans and he’s not only helping out us by, you know, giving us lots of great feedback and help, and also places where
we can improve as well. But, also, he’s giving lots of user-generated content
to help other users. So, thank you for that first of all, Chad. Stories. – Oh, no problem. – Your stories are pretty much all on, sorry, scenes or whatever, whatever content you put
in, it’s all on point pretty much, and it’s, yeah. You get it. You get the course and you got it from the early days, right? – Yeah, I mean I had to get the concept of a memory palace down. How to make the scenes, props, actors, all of that. So, it’s kinda getting my feet wet there in the beginning. I think even Phil critiqued a few of my early ones, like From. – [Phil] Right, yeah. – Christopher Walken in The Walker. But listening to those critiques and stuff help me to become a little bit better at this process. – Yeah, yeah. It’s definitely useful to get the feedback from other people. And I know that simply because I had Luke in the beginning. Like we would talk about
our different scenes and that was just one
other person you know, using a technique that is not as developed as the Mandarin Blueprint method is. And now we got, you know, obviously we answer questions, but also this user-generated content, so it’s quite helpful. You’ve actually been directly, even replying to people sometimes with suggestions
which is great so. – [Chad] Yeah. – And I’m always very apprehensive about critiquing stuff because it’s, you’re already doing so
well and I feel like. – [Chad] Right. – I’m worried that some people might be like well hey I’m
already doing really well, why do you have to be like oh this could be slightly better or this could be slightly better? – [Chad] Right. – I’d rather you get
the the fact that we’re just giving general guidelines as to what would help certain people. But we always try and
add a caveat of like this as long as it works for you this specific scene then
that’s fine (mumbling). – [Chad] Right. – Yeah. – Yeah. – I mean the critiques are good. I think even, you know, if I was on character you know 300 and I submitted a scene and you guys were like well this is good, but you know maybe add this or add that. I think there was a couple times there were some critiques and then I read some of the scene examples and I put them into scenes in the future where you know similar
props were being used and it really does help. I mean you have to be willing to continue to learn especially with the memory palace and until you really get it. I am not even close to
really getting it yet. – I think you got a lot of it. – I think you’re very close, actually. Yeah, I think you’re
doing really, really well. – Well before we get too far. – Yeah I feel like we jumped the gun here ’cause for the listeners and the watchers we wanna know that. Could you just give them
a brief introduction? Like who are you? What was the problem that you’re facing that caused you to search
for a Chinese course? Or where did you hear about us? That sort of thing. – [Chad] Okay. – Yeah, so a self introduction please. Who are you? – Yeah, obviously I already gave my name. My name is Chad Ressler,
I’m from Pennsylvania, in the United States. I’m engaged, I have two kids, my family is very supportive. I am actually an auto
technician for Walmart. Just wanna give a shout-out to Junior, Ty, and Aaron, I promised them I would. And as for learning Chinese, it was something I wanted
to do some years ago, but that never really got any traction. And then it was about the end of December of this year, I was talking to my fiancé, big fan of Kung Fu. – [Luke] Yeah, we noticed that. – I’ve seen all the movies. Yeah and you know I was
just like watching some they were in Mandarin and I was like, you know that’s such a beautiful language, I wonder if I could learn that? And I thought well that’d
be great thing to try. So, I did the typical buy textbooks, buy some diagrams, buy some flashcards, thought that was how I
had supposed to start. And I’m like well I know I’m gonna need a program, I know I’m gonna need some structure, even though it is going to be self study. That’s when I started getting online and looking at different programs. I don’t know how many I
looked at, quite a few. And I was actually doing a free trial of one program and came back to the Mandarin Blueprint, that’s when I saw Luke
sorta introductory video, were he’s sitting on the bench, he’s speaking Chinese
and he’s really fluent. And I’m like you know this guy looks like he knows what he’s doing, maybe I ought to give them a shot. So, I remember talking
to my fiancé about it and I said you know, I think I need to try this. To be perfectly honest, I was skeptical. I didn’t believe the claim, there’s no way I’m gonna learn this much in three months. There’s no way this is gonna work, it’s completely antithetical to everything I’ve done. I have two master’s degrees, so I’m well versed in traditional methods of learning. Well I started the free trial and I think it was probably, I don’t know, I might have been five
or six characters in and that was it, I was hooked. In fact I think I send an email, I’ve been telling my
fiancé about the course, and I said yeah I learned
this new word today, I learned this new character today. And you know what I couldn’t remember it. So, we’re driving and I
thought about the scene that we had to create for it. And I’m like wait a minute that was G and then here’s the ending and these were the props. And I’m like, oh yeah, and right then, that day I paid for it. – [Luke] Yeah. – And that’s how I got started with the Mandarin Blueprint. – That’s awesome man, thank you. And also, I remember, didn’t you comment about that little sort of epiphany moment, or was it someone else? – Yeah, it was Gary Oldman
and my father-in-law had this backyard, it was
(speaks foreign language) individual, measure word. And I couldn’t, I was telling her about it and I said, I can’t remember this,
and I’m like wait a minute but I remember Gary
Oldman and Ed’s backyard. And there was an umbrella and it was just a unique bedazzled umbrella among all of these black ones. I’m like oh yeah, yeah it’s individual. – [Luke] Right, right, yeah. – And I was like, okay I’m sold. Here’s my credit card information. – Your story sounds actually very similar to my own. Because I was interested in martial arts. I did it all through my teens you know kung fu specifically actually Shaolin martial arts, Wing Chun, and all of that sort of stuff. And that was what sparked my interest and I paint Chinese characters on the wall and stuff like that. And that was what led me to go to China when I was like 19. And also yeah the same thing I’ve got a textbook of course struggled, struggled, struggled thought I was just rubbish at languages. And then then I sort of went out and started searching online for stuff as I sort of stumbled across it and figured it out. – Yeah. Yeah, I mean Chinese is a lot different than Spanish, French where you know you’re gonna have that alphabet you’re familiar with. It’s not gonna seem as daunting. You look at Chinese and it’s like there isn’t even an alphabet. So, looks a lot harder really than it is. – Yeah, yeah. I mean it’s like that’s the biggest challenge of Chinese for sure it’s definitely the characters right at the beginning. But just before we kind of. So, one of the things I’m wondering about is apart from just sort of interest in the language as it is and you’re interesting kung-fu which made you sort of realize that the language was beautiful as you put it and I agree. But like is there any other
motivation driving you? Is there anything you’re planning on doing with being able to speak Chinese? Or it’s just pure about the language? – No, it’s about the language, that’s it. I mean, not just about the language. Obviously, you wanna learn
more about the people, the culture, their history. I mean even even if you only want some maybe some historical movies. I mean it’s just a rich history. They have a very long history that I think a lot of people in the West probably don’t even understand. – Yeah, it’s a little bit tough to kinda put yourself in that mindset to realize. It’s like oh wow this entire. I mean I don’t even think that they really think of themselves like saying that China is a country is not even the best word. It’s really more of a civilization. It’s like that’s the way
they view themselves. – [Chad] Yeah, exactly.
– A great civilization, you know? – Yeah, that’s right and there’s often, you often get from certain foreigners and they’ll be like, well China doesn’t have
5000 years of history. They’re talking rubbish
because that’s what they always tend to say. But it just doesn’t translate very well I don’t think. What they’re talking
about is their culture. Their cultural history which is undeniably incredibly old and deep in its losses. Well, until today despite the Cultural Revolution (laughing). – Yeah, well I mean if anything the Cultural Revolution is a testament to how strong their culture is. The fact that it survived you know sort of an intentional path to destroy it but it still survived. – Yeah. – [Man] It’s amazing. – In fact, I watched the documentary and they kind of chronicled this family that was able to recover almost like 1,000 years worth of their history even after Mao’s Cultural Revolution kind of tried to erase all of it. This guy from actually he lived in America but he went back to China and he recovered years
of his family’s history. – [Luke] Like relics and
things from his ancestors? – Yeah – [Luke] Wow. That’s amazing. – Yeah, and they had generations and generations of their family. You know in America we’d
have a family reunion but I mean it was massive. They tracked all of these people down. It was crazy. – Yeah, I’m really curious after talking about all of this. What about if you actually. Well, not if it’s more like when you actually succeed with Chinese and you become
fluent and literate. What will that mean for you and what will you do with it if anything? I mean. – Honestly, I don’t know. It’s for me. I’ll be able to sit, and relax, and watch a
Chinese movie without having to read subtitles anymore, I’ll just understand it. – [Luke] Well, you’re be reading the Chinese subtitles (laughing). – Yeah, I’ll move onto that. Maybe if you know people want to learn Chinese I’ll be glad to help them learn. But mostly it’s just for me. I mean, I would like to eventually you know make some friends you know maybe from China. Especially with you know technology now you can you know chat with people
and get to know people. And actually learn a little bit more about the culture you know? But mainly it’s just for me. If a job opportunity
were to present itself certainly I would you know do something like that. But that’s not my main goal.
– [Luke] Right. – It’s just simply for me. – Well you’ll find that I think that’s a really good starting point. I think that if someone’s
just okay I’m really interested in this it seems it’s just a pretty language. And I think it’ll give me access to an interesting culture. I think that’s one of the best reasons for learning anything. – Yeah, yeah. – I think it would be very difficult, I think to learn Chinese if you’re being forced to learn it or if you feel like oh my gosh I have to learn this I have to get this job or I have to get this promotion. So, I just have to learn
it I think you’re gonna miss out on quite a bit. – We always say that. Yeah, that’s exactly right because we always talk about try to enjoy the journey of it. If you don’t enjoy the journey of it you’ll never enjoy it. – [Chad] Right. – Once you’re fluent in Chinese, if that’s just your goal, I want to be fluent so I can I don’t know get a job or show off at a party or something. Then you’re not gonna know you’re fluent. You’re not gonna enjoy the moment when you are because you’ll just be you. But that’s where you
must enjoy the journey. – And I think especially with the Mandarin Blueprint in fact you just said something I guess I didn’t realize until we were talking about this. But on your page you’re like you can acquire as much as 80% of Chinese in three months. People are gonna read that and think it’s crazy. But you know what if
you’re somebody who is like I have to learn this I just I gotta get this now, I need it. Then the Mandarin Blueprint actually can do that for you. You can acquire it but for somebody like me who’s like you know I just want to enjoy the journey. I’m gonna take those characters slower. I might like right now I do at most seven a day. I think that was my
highest number in one day. Other than that I take my time and I basically control the amount of Anki cards I have in one day. But if you need it quick, this can do it. – I mean, there’s only
so much time in the day. But yeah there’s plenty of people out there who are like we don’t think of it like this because we don’t think it’s the right metric. We shouldn’t say somebody who’s full-time studying. Like every day they’re spending eight hours on it. But if you spent eight
hours a day on this I mean you could get done in way less than three months. – Well, three months is based on three hours a day. We did the calculation. As a conservative estimate. If someone put in three hours, in terms of learning and reviewing, like everything together they could cover all the materials and have it in this certain stage of Anki as in their long-term
memory in three months. – So, one of the things that we wanted to ask you about is a little bit more of the specifics. So, like, the specifics of the system and what it is that you like about it. So, you know, perhaps you could go into I was thinking you know there’s a lot
of things in our system. There’s a number of things
you could talk about. So, maybe if you could try to boil it down to maybe three things about the system that you find to be either the most surprising or the things that you find the most useful. Or just anything that you kinda look at and you go that thing has made the
biggest impact on my interest in this you know system. Or at least progress in the system. – Okay, the first thing is gonna be you and Luke. That’s primary. If you look at the system and who developed it and why they developed it that’s important. You got Luke he went self-study and he did that and made mistakes, learned from ’em. You guys both have your credentials HSK-6. So, he’s done it that way. You took a different approach. You went to the university. And that was one thing that got me into the Mandarin Blueprint was that I saw hey okay
here’s the other guy here’s Phil he went to the university. He’s got all this
research to back this up. This isn’t something
they just threw together. So, number one is trust. You can trust the program because of how it developed. You can look at a couple of different things
two guys came together. And here’s what you have. The second thing is it totally abandons traditional methods of learning a language. And you learn it naturally. You learn it like a child. Like when people ask me about oh you’re learning Chinese, oh you can speak Chinese. I said yeah I can speak Chinese and I can read Chinese about as well as a three-year-old right now. Because that’s where I’m at in my journey, you know? And you learn pronunciation first then you learn characters. You learn words you hear them all the time. Then right now I’m starting to learn sentences. But the thing about it is is once I got to level 13 and I began the sentences, because I had gone through and learned these words and drilled them every day the sentences were no problem. Do I understand the grammar? Not yet I don’t but I
understand those sentences when I see ’em. I can put words together. I’m like oh okay oh
that’s what this means. You know? Like I can I can see what this means. I don’t understand the grammar rules. I worked for a university for a while helping kids who were writing you know like their graduate papers and stuff. And you know putting in comments about the finer points of English. I don’t know any of those with Chinese but I’m understanding how a sentence is starting to go together. So, that’s the second thing. You’ll learn it naturally
and it’s a lot easier. You don’t even know you’re learning it. If you do this program don’t think about sentences then once you hit level 13 and you read your first sentence you will see what I mean. The third thing is the
memory palace concept. That’s the key. That is the key. I think I’m at 111 characters right now. I can easily remember 107 of them with no problem. Yes would I have to
recall my memory palace? Yes. But maybe it was in the last podcaster or it might have been
in a video that you guys posted on YouTube. Phil had mentioned with rote learning you don’t have anything to go back to. You forget it you, you forget it. You got to go back and write it 25 times again. I don’t have to do that. When I forget a letter I’m like you know what I kind of know that word and I think my my brother-in-law was doing this at my garage and there was this prop in that. Oh yeah that’s what it is yeah it might take me a minute to get it but I get it. So, I would say those are the three main reasons why if you’re looking for a program this is your program. I don’t think any other
programs gonna give you those three things. So, trust, a natural
path to speaking Chinese, and a technique that has thousands of years behind it. I think that’s about how
long it’s been around. – [Luke] Something like that. – You know all the new linguistic research that you know you guys provide. Just it’s key.
– [Luke] Absolutely. – Learning how to do it. Learn how to do the
memory palace, definitely. – So, one thing I’m really curious about as well is have you found that your speed of learning the characters and progressing through the course is increasing
as you go through? – Yeah, I know I could go faster, I do. And Ron White said this in one of his videos that I was watching. Pardon me? – Ron White’s a memory athlete correct? – Yeah, Ron White is a two-time USA memory champion. And he said in one of his videos he said you know if you want to increase your speed and get better you have to trust your memory. – [Phil Yeah. – Yeah, I do. I trust it but there’s some days I’m like don’t go too fast you know? Make sure you really
cement these characters. But I could easily do, I don’t see why I couldn’t do 10 or 15 in a single day. – You’re an engineer, is that correct? A technician? – No, I’m a service tech. I just work on the cars. That’s it. – It’s very possible. The reason why I ask is you seem to have a very analytical mind. We’ve had a few sort of people in that very left brain I guess. I don’t know if that’s sort of a myth now but. – Yeah, I mean my degrees are in a more analytical area but I don’t do anything related to that I sort of just do something different just something I enjoy. – Yeah, the reason why I mentioned that is because it over the years we’ve taught people live directly, many, many people and we noticed that there’s certain types of people that handle it differently. And it’s very interesting to observe that, you know? Like we’ve heard analytical minds and they tend to take their time more with it. – [Man] Yeah, that’s me. – Not in terms of an anxious sort of way but just in the sort of like let’s make sure I get this right. – Yeah that’s how it was with me. – We’ve had other people on the other end of the spectrum that immediately jump into sort of a very free
sort of flow with it. And just sorta go okay, boom, boom, boom, okay, next one, next
one, next one, next one. And they progress a lot faster, it’s just different styles you know? – Yeah I think you’ve mentioned a couple of people and one guy
I think he said in an email or something that he did like the 600 characters in like three months. And then somebody else did like so many in like a month and a half. See I don’t know, I don’t trust myself enough to do that. I don’t want to make any mistakes. I want to make sure that you know don’t rush this and have to go back and fix anything. Do it right one time so that you get it. – Yeah, I think that that approach is very good. But let me just make just for the purpose of like saying the alternative viewpoint on it. Just because I think that especially in your position where you’re just studying it for the language itself, and you’re you’re not
particularly worried about how quickly you do. It’s not of concern to you. But consider this. So, suppose that every day you know at this point you understand the method completely I think it’s perfectly reasonable to take your time with it when you don’t understand the method yet but once you completely get how the method works. If you do say I don’t know you go for some really high goal like 50 characters a day right. Well you probably are
gonna go a little bit too fast and you are gonna forget maybe let’s say 10 to 15% of the characters that you put
into your Ankie queue. Well, that means that you didn’t forget 80 to 85% of them and then Anki is gonna solidify them and so it’s kind of like sure it’s not as meticulous right at the beginning and you’re gonna have to go back and fix some things and go back
in your memory palace. But the overall speed will definitely be faster and then you can get to the more advanced content where you’re gonna get to simplify the characters at a higher layer. So, it’s like you solidify the characters because you’re seeing them in a paragraph. And again I’m not saying that this is what you should do. I think you should keep doing it how you want to do it. I’m just sort of putting
forward the alternative. Is that you know if you’re rote learning you have
to do what you’re saying. You have to. – I was just gonna say that. – Yeah, and with this you have the option to just
quickly if you want. – Yeah, I was gonna say that. With the Mandarin Blueprint you might have to do what I do. If you’re somebody who can hit it hard get 600 characters in
two and a half months. Great, do it. Yes, definitely if it’s
gonna get you to your Chinese goal faster and that’s what you want that’s great. Yes, do it. And you have that. That’s the the great thing about this program is you have freedom. You can choose when you
want to acquire that 80%. You want to do it in two years or do you want to
do it in three months? All up to you. – Yeah, that’s video courses, man. It’s the way of the future. – I will just say this
one last thing about that which is you get this method, Chad. So, you definitely could if you wanted to. You could smash through this. – And, I mean, if there’s other people that wanna get the method. – [Luke] Yeah. – I mean, yeah, obviously you have do it every day. Maybe take one or two days off a week. But don’t be afraid to go and do some research on memory palaces. Watch Ron White’s videos. Go watch some other memory champions just to listen to how they explain memory palaces. And it really took off for me once I did that, once I took a day and I said you know what I want to learn more about this concept and I watched some YouTube videos. You don’t have to run out buy some books and do excessive research. But just go and watch some of this stuff and just appreciate it and then apply all of that to you know
the Hansi movie method. – Awesome, yeah. Great advice. – One thing I wanted to ask about here just to dig a little bit deeper into the the second point
that you made there. You said understanding the sentences you said I don’t understand the grammar but I understand the sentence. And the reason why I said
that warms my heart is because that’s how everybody naturally acquires grammar. And really grammar is just a word that linguists came up with after they you know ex-post facto analyzed the language and said okay there’s some structure to how we’re speaking language. But even in Chinese, I think Chinese grammar as this field of study is only like 100 years old. So, it’s kind of you know it’s clearly not how we naturally acquire the ability to put a sentence together correctly. The way we do it is we understand sentences
and then eventually we just have a feeling. It’s just a feeling in the same way that you know if I’m practicing drums for years and I play the snare
drum on the wrong beat I just feel that it’s wrong. I can’t like you know articulate to you exactly why in the history of jazz
like they never used to put the snare drum here. It’s just I’ve listened to hours and hours of jazz and that’s not
what they do, you know? It’s out of time it’s not the right spot. And that’s how it ends
up feeling with Chinese when you just get that mass input of understanding and I love that. It’s like I understand the sentence, I don’t understand the grammar. Good, don’t worry about it. – I don’t understand English grammar. I proved that to myself when I started teaching English. Years ago when I first came to China someone would say but why is that word there and why not in the same order? I was like, homework. That’s your homework. – (laughing) – I don’t know. – [Chad] Yeah. – When I was helpin’ students with their papers and you know it’s like I knew when I would read something you know that sounds terrible. You wrote it like you would speak it and it doesn’t work. And then I’m like well wait a minute and I’d have to I grab a book and I’d be like oh wait okay that’s why. And then I’d write it in and I’ll tell you what I have a book it’s sitting right underneath me it’s called Chinese Verbs and Grammar. And it’s tempting not to pick up some days and and start reading it to try to understand. But I know if I do that that’s not good so I’m like I just got to trust myself. And every once in a while I’ll look up a little something if I’m having trouble understanding something. I might be like okay well that just kind of cleared up a little fog. But I don’t use it to
to teach myself grammar. I have to you know just kinda trust myself to
acquire it naturally. – [Luke] Yeah. – And you really have to discipline yourself to do that. – Yeah, 100% and that’s
actually one of the reasons why we’re working
working on grammar flowcharts with with characters and words that you know you’ve already learned by certain points in the course. And the reason for that is basically because sometimes it’s just as an adult you’re just insatiably curious about like well why is it this way not that way? And we encourage people to try their best to still rely on just the mass input. But we get that that doesn’t feel as good as looking at like something like a flow chart and going oh I see you know? You can make like 10 sentences with the same structure. And so we’re working on those right now. They’re a bit more
complicated than we expected, but I like that too because you know that means that they’ll be more valuable to people. It’s like in terms of just designing them and coming up with ways that are very clear. And all the different
flow charts you can make. But I think that’s a good way to kind of satiate that curiosity while staying in the same sort of
understandable input realm. It’s not like you’re reading a rule, you’re reading a kind of a formulaic chart sort of. – We’ll talk about more there. We’ll bring you some
examples in very soon. – Thursday. – Maybe even next week. – Yeah. – So, awesome. – Okay, cool. So, moving onto like another question. You know when it comes to. You’ve kind of talked about sort of the results that
you’ve had so far in terms of like specific things you’ve learned. 111 characters and you’re understanding sentences and things like that. But are there any sort
of more kind of I guess meta results in terms of how you are feeling towards the language? Have you noticed any changes in how it’s affecting maybe how
you think a little bit? It might be a little early for that but it’s possible maybe the memory palace. – [Chad] No. – Or something like that. How people are responding to you trying to do this. Anything you want to comment on that? – General impacts, yeah. – Yeah. – Yeah, I mean it definitely starts to shape your thinking
a little differently. Especially depending on why you’re doing if you’re doing it for yourself you might kind of I don’t know sort of opens your mind a little bit. Gets just thinking differently not just about language itself but you know sometimes other things and wanting to sort of expand from
beyond where you’re at. You know and to understand more things. But I think one important thing is you know with the pronunciation. That is really key and that is really gonna open things up in the beginning for you. I watch a lot of Chinese movies, television shows, and you know being able to correctly hear it. I mean it’s worked wonders in sort of acquiring words you know that way. Not necessarily you know acquiring a lot of new vocabulary but in terms of being able to practice there’s so much more you can do. You know, not a lot of people, well maybe after this they will but I don’t think a lot of people really know that this is something I’m doing. I have talked to you know like the guys at work. In fact, I taught junior a word you know. We like to roast each other so this is obviously Chinese. They like to use that as a joke. But I was like okay well that’s funny but I’m gonna show you
that you can do this. No, I actually kind of did a little mini like memory palace thing for him and it’s funny because when I ask him now if I say, what’s Chinese word for six? He’ll tell me, he knows. And he can’t forget it. But like my family’s really supportive, especially my fiance. Let me tell you how supportive she is. I watched so much Chinese television that she can tell the difference between Mandarin and Cantonese. That’s how much I watch. And she doesn’t even speak Chinese. – Yeah, that’s significant. You cannot tell if you don’t know anything about either language. – Yeah. – Yeah, that’s awesome. – She recognizes words. It’s funny ’cause she’ll be like, oh yeah you say that. I hear that all the time. So, yeah, it’s funny.
– [Luke] That’s really good to know. – No, I mean, there’s
there’s definitely a lot of you know it’s fun it’s definitely been enjoyable and you know definitely changed you
know some things for me. – I think giving you more access to that I think that as you develop the language you’re gonna get more out of the content you’re consuming. I think that’s gonna
be a big thing for you. – So, yeah I want to make a quick tangent about Mandarin and Cantonese because
listening to Cantonese now. Sometimes when I’m watching YouTube on my phone I’ll be on a Hong Kong server on my phone. And so I’ll get Cantonese ads.
– Ads, yeah. – And it’s funny because I listen to it I’m like I feel like I can understand this but I can’t. You’re like, I don’t understand this.
– Every now and then they’ll say. Or mayo or something. – But it’s funny how
like you listen to it. I’m sure that if I went to learn Cantonese now it would be way easier than if I were starting from scratch. So, moving on. – Yeah, because we will be respectful of your time so we want to keep it relatively
structured, Chad, as well. So, we know it’s quite late over there and it’s getting on. So, another question we have for you is what were you skeptical about? So, you’ve already sort of mentioned that you were skeptical about the 80% in three months sort of line. But was there anything else even when you already started the course before you were convinced was there anything that you were skeptical about and said, no I don’t know if this is gonna work? Or I don’t really believe that? Can you go into a bit of detail there? – Yeah, and it wasn’t just the claims that were being made. Just sort of as a caveat here. In my life I’ve only
ever bought two products where it said hey do this in you know such-and-such a time frame. This was the second one. The one other worked just as well as I thought it would and this one. But once I signed up I just did the did a free trial and I started goin’ through the video. And you started talking
about the movie method. And honestly my first thought was this is ridiculous. This is ridiculous. I cannot do this. This is not me. I don’t learn like this. I read textbooks, and I take notes, and I watch lectures. And that’s what I do and that’s how I’m gonna learn this. But I kept goin’, got
through those videos. I’m like alright look, these guys apparently know what they’re talking about I’m just gonna throw it all away and I’m gonna listen to what they tell me to do. I’m simply gonna do what they tell me to do and I’ll see what happens. And like I said it was probably four or five characters in that I really started to see the difference. But yeah, I was initially skeptical. As soon as I got into the free trial. Oh memory palaces, and props, and actors, and I gotta sit here and assign people these letters and I got assigned sets and pick places. This is stupid. That’s exactly what I thought. It’s just stupid. I’m not gonna do this. Here I am 111 characters later and I can practically remember ’em all. – Yeah, that’s fantastic. Wow, we get it. We understand it. It’s a tough sell because we’re basically being you should only do characters first. Which is most.
– [Chad] That’s it too. – Courses will be like no don’t worry about characters yet because they’re gonna scare you and I don’t want to scare you. So, and we’re big advocates for no get right into ’em. Get right into ’em because you’re gonna be so happy you did in the future.
– [Chad] Yes. – Obviously thinking long term for them you know and not necessarily a short term. But luckily the memory palace is fun so it’s like you know once you get into it you’re like
actually this is kind of silly and enjoyable. – One of the early videos, sorry go ahead. – You definitely have to. I mean honestly and for people watching there will. I’ve even had times. I don’t know if this happened with you guys but there were a couple of days where you know you wanted us to pick an actor for you know whatever. And I seriously would
stay here for 20 minutes, is that gonna work? No, that actor really doesn’t work for me it’s
not powerful enough. But I really don’t know anybody. And then I’d eventually. I got a couple actors that honestly I’m surprised I remember the character half the time when I have to use ’em. But I kinda try to picture ’em in movies that I’m really familiar with and then that way if I can kind of remember that character
they played it helps. – That’s a good thing to point out. Although, oh man, facial recognition. We’re amazing at it. we’re so good at it.
– [Chad] Yeah. I had a couple of actors
that were like very tenuous relationships. But still giving me problems by the end. I actually built my relationship up with them in my brain. You know what (laughing) I mean? – I choose Indira Gandhi for mine based on a suggestion. – [Chad] (laughing). – I had to figure out because I couldn’t think of what I wanted for I. Or why I or whatever. – Mine was Z and I took Billy Zane. And honestly, I either think of him in the Substitute with Tom Barrenger in the cameo and stuff. Or from Zoolander. And that’s it. Those are the two that I have. – Yeah, I mean, I can understand why people get intimidated or skeptical because it’s like as well as learning Chinese and learning characters you also have to learn this little mini language as well. – [Chad] Right. People might be intimidated by that I know I was when I started. But it is not as hard as you think it is. Because you do have some connection already or just simply organizing those connections in your brain. And that’s why I had my fiancee make that thing so I could organize my sets in my head and I can see them better. Rather than having ’em be fuzzy when I would pull ’em up here and there I organized them so I could see ’em better in my mind. – Sure, yeah, that was a great idea. Chad’s referring to and
I think we talked about this a couple podcasts ago. The memory sort you created it like an inception-like place where you have a rode you walk down that
is littered with your past locations as opposed to you know what we just did before. Which was go to the place in your mind. You just imagine yourself at your workplace when you were 21. Which works but it was cool how you did it that way.
– [Chad] Right. I mean, you guys call this the Hansi movie method so I’m like okay. Well, in my mind, then is a movie production company and I have sets I have a lot. And in this lot I have 13 areas where I’ve lived and I have to put them together and now I can better see myself going into some of these sets. And it’s not like sort
of a hazy picture and I can actually create these movie scenes. – Yeah, that’s just like the scene from Inside Out. You ever seen that move that Pixar movie Inside Out? – Mm-mm, no. – That’s a great movie. You should watch it. But there’s this moment
where they’re inside this little girl’s brain. It’s the premise of the movie is that her emotion or like personified. So, you have joy, and sadness, and anger, and whatever. And so joy and sadness are in her dream movie making. It’s just like a Hollywood movie set that they’re walking around with all the different dreams that they’re trying to create each night. It was pretty it was wild. You just reminded me of that by thinking of it as a Hollywood set. So, yeah, cool cool. – Yeah, so that’s something that other people can do. – And that’s great. So, I guess the final question we would want to ask you here is would you recommend
people try the course? – Yeah, definitely. At least do the free trial. If you’re not convinced after the free trial I don’t know what to tell you. Because I mean this is the way to go. And one thing I did want to mention. I know that we had talked about this right before we got started here. Is while you’re doing the course, if you can I’m a beginner Chinese learner and you know this has helped me if you can’t learn by immersion. You know you can’t be in China, create your own Chinese environment wherever you are. There’s a lot of great Chinese movies. There’s a lot of great Chinese TV shows. Use Netflix, Prime, all that. You can search Mandarin language movies. Have ’em on as much as you can. Make a Mandarin language
playlist on Spotify and listen to it as much as you can. If you are gonna do the course, my biggest piece of advice do the pronunciation course first. Take time and go through that. Make sure before you know you start doing the characters and really gettin’ into it you know how to
pronounce the sounds. That’s gonna make it 10 times easier to get through the course. And while you’re going through the course and you’ve created your Chinese language environment, you have the pronunciation. You will begin to be able to sorta decipher it on TV. If you don’t understand it you will hear words that you’re familiar with and you’ll kinda start to get a feel for
it like a child would. As you’re going through the Mandarin Blueprint you’re gonna be learning naturally. Well, we’re growing up TV’s always on and people are playing stuff. We’re hearing it all the time. That’s really what you have to do as a beginning learner. And then just going through the course, make sure you do Anki every day. And I have a confession it’s 10:00, 11:00 at night here I haven’t done my flashcards yet. As soon as we’re done here I’m gonna do my flashcards. – Yeah, yeah. – That’s great advice. Wow, yeah. I mean sorry. Man, I just had something that I was just thinking then you distracted me with Anki. – Yeah, Anki. It’s like the greatest and worst application but overall the greatest. – (laughing) It’s a
love-hate relationship. – (laughing) Yeah. – Yeah, I had to come up with watched its tutorials. Take a day take one of your days you’re gonna study learn Anki. – Yeah, yeah, we’ve put a full like shared Google slide presentation on how to use Anki with the Mandarin Blueprint method. And you know it’s because Anki’s complicated it’s a little bit long but it’s also you know well worth your time to do it because you know it will make sure that you remember everything. – Absolutely. Yeah, I just remember
what I was gonna say. So, talking about sort of correlating listening and watching material. That’s a great point. And that is something that never stops by the way. In order to maintain your interest and zest for this language. And especially if you’re out of China constantly looking and exploring for new Chinese stuff is really important. And I’m still doing it. For example, I haven’t been much of a reader for a long time but I’m getting back into reading again. I’m especially exploring new topics to read so I’ve just downloaded all of Isaac Asimov’s sci-fi. I’ve never read sci-fi before but I’ve downloaded in Chinese and it’s really cool. I’m loving it and maybe in three months time I’ll be done with Isaac and I’ll move on to more listening material or you know
using different things. – [Chad] Right. – So, always be on the lookout. And that’s part of your hobby as well. Not just learning Chinese but exploring Chinese stuff that’s part of it. A very important part of it. – I think, one of the
big things when I started learning this as one sort of hang up I had was I’m probably
never gonna get to China. So, am I really ever
gonna be able to learn it? And I can’t remember who it was but they actually said, look you don’t have to go
to China learn Chinese. There’s people in China you know that have gone over there that never learned to speak it. – [Phil] That’s true. – But if you can create that environment and that’s sorta what I chose to do. And sometimes it’s not easy especially if you’re getting started. Here’s one problem that
you might come across. Is they’ll say, yes this
movie is in Chinese. Well, then you turn the TV on, you go to watch the movie, it’s not Mandarin, it’s Cantonese. – [Phil] Yeah. – People sometimes don’t
make the distinction between okay this is Mandarin and this is Cantonese. Most of your Kung Fu movies out of Hong Kong, they’re in Cantonese. A lot of the action movies, they’re out of Hong Kong, they’re in Cantonese unless they dub ’em in Mandarin. You really have to be specific. Netflix does a great job. Once you watch a few, they will create for you a Mandarin language movies and TV. Detective Dee, watch that. Brotherhood of Blades, that’s my favorite. Those are some good movies. There’s some really good TV shows. It’s a little harder on Prime to search for it. But you can do it. Hulu and Vudu, they don’t have a large selection. They might have a couple. Like Jet Li movies If you’re a Donnie Yen fan, they’re mostly in Cantonese. I’ve got bad news. It Man, all Cantonese. – [Phil] There are definitely Mandarin dubs for it. But, yeah, yeah, that’s true. – There are, yeah. But if you’re on Netflix.
– [Phil] It’s tough. – You have to kinda be willing to step outside, watch some new stuff. One other piece of advice. I watched a lot of movies that were, obviously set in 200 AD, 600 AD. Make sure you watch some that are set in 2000 so the vocabulary that you’re hearing if sorta of up-to-date. I would look on Plego and they’re probably
not even used anymore. – Sorry, there’s a show
(foreign language). I’ll send you the name
of it on the chat here. Because it’s set in the ancient times. It’s set in a long time ago. But it’s using modern language and lots of different dialects, as well, and it’s very fun. – That would be good. – [Luke] Yeah, it’s very good. Different dialects as well. And it’s genuinely quite funny. Yeah. – Yeah, getting exposed
to different dialects. You might even start hearin’ some that you like. There’s a couple of actors and I like their accent. It’s kinda like, well, if I’m gonna speak Chinese and I can sorta develop an accent I think it’s like the
(foreign language) accent. I think you guys kinda taught us a couple of words like that. Like (foreign language). I like that. I like that kind of accent. Sort of from that northern area. But, yeah, you’ll find stuff like that that you just enjoy hearing. Just practice it. – Yeah, awesome. Well, Chad, throughout this entire podcast I’ve been thinking that people need to be more like you in their attitudes. They need to be like Chad. So, that’s gonna be the discount code or coupon code for anybody who wants to get into this course and try it out. Of course, we already have the free pronunciation mastery and the free trial
Mandarin Blueprint method. But for the next period of time. How ’bout the next two months we’ll have a discount code be like Chad. And if you type in be like Chad at checkout of the Mandarin Blueprint method you will get a nice discount. And the reason why I say two months is ’cause we’d like to talk to you again in two months, Chad. We’d like to see how you’re doing. See what kind of progress you’ve made. So, keep it up. Keep doin’ it every day. I bet two months from now you’ll have a lot more to say. – [Chad] Yes, definitely. – This is great to talk to you. – And to anyone listening if you wanna give it a shot they’ll be a link and go ahead and put in that code when you think you’re ready. – Awesome. Great. – Yeah, you will not regret it. If you wanna actually acquire it and not learn about Chinese, then this is definitely the program for you. – Excellent, Chad. Well, thanks so much. – [Chad] You’re welcome. – And we’ll see you guys
on the next podcast. – All right, sounds good. (upbeat music)

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